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I have a composite primary key table (Maintenance Items). I would like to create another table which maps a parent child relationship between items within this table.

I am not sure how to create the Parent Child Relationship table see below either option 1 or option 2.

NOTE: Our business rules stipulate that a parent child relationship can only exits between maintenance items which share the same maintenance program. This will never change!

Table Maintenance Programs
ProgramCode (Primary Key)
ProgramDescription
Other Columns ...

Table Maintenance Items (Composite Primary key Table)
ProgramCode (Composite Primary Key)
MaintenanceCode (Composite Primary Key)
MaintenanceDescription
Other Columns ...

Table Parent/Child Maintenance Items (Option 1)
ProgramCode
ParentMaintenanceCode
ChildMaintenanceCode

Table Parent/Child Maintenance Items (Option 2)
ParentProgramCode (Same value as ChildProgramCode)
ParentMaintenanceCode
ChildProgramCode (Same value as ParentProgramCode)
ChildMaintenanceCode

There will be no other columns in the Parent/Child tables it is a relationship mapping table only.

Which is the better option? Option 2 seems to suit best practises but given our buisness rule means we essentially have two columns with exactly the same data (ProgramCode).

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The only reason for using an associative entity like you're suggesting is if you want a many-to-many relationship between maintenance items. If that is what you're after, then option 1 is what you do. The schema would look like something like

create table MaintenanceProgram
(
  ProgramCode int not null ,

  ... -- other non-key attributes here

  primary key ( ProgramCode ) ,

)
create table MaintenanceItem
(
  ProgramCode     int not null ,
  MaintenanceCode int not null ,

  ... -- other non-key attributes here

  primary key ( ProgramCode , MaintenanceCode ) ,

  foreign key                     ( ProgramCode )
    references MaintenanceProgram ( ProgramCode ) ,

)
create table MaintenanceItemMap
(
  ProgramCode           int not null , 
  ParentMaintenanceCode int not null ,
  ChildMaintenanceCode  int not null ,

  primary key ( ProgramCode , ParentMaintenanceCode , ChildMaintenanceCode ) ,

  foreign key                  ( ProgramCode , ParentMaintenanceCode )
    references MaintenanceItem ( ProgramCode , MaintenanceCode       ) ,
  foreign key                  ( ProgramCode , ChildMaintenanceCode  )
    references MaintenanceItem ( ProgramCode , MaintenanceCode       ) ,

  check ( ParentMaintenanceCode != ChildMaintenanceCode ) ,

)

This ensure that all related maintenance items share the same ProgramCode and that a maintenance item cannot map to itself (the check constraint).

However, your problem statement refers to a parent/child relationship, which sounds more like a hierarchy/tree. In this case, the schema you would want would look something like this:

create table MaintenanceProgram
(
  ProgramCode int not null ,

  ... -- other non-key attributes here

  primary key ( ProgramCode ) ,

)
create table MaintenanceItem
(
  ProgramCode           int not null ,
  MaintenanceCode       int not null ,
  ParentMaintenanceCode int     null ,

  ... -- other non-key attributes here

  primary key ( ProgramCode , MaintenanceCode ) ,

  foreign key                     ( ProgramCode  )
    references MaintenanceProgram (  ProgramCode ) ,
  foreign key                     ( ProgramCode , ParentMaintenanceCode )
    references MaintenanceItem    ( ProgramCode , MaintenanceCode       ) ,

  check ( MaintenanceCode != ParentMaintenanceCode or ParentMaintenanceCode is null ) ,

)

The above says that each maintenance item is related to a single maintenance program; conversely, that each maintenance program has zero or more maintenance items.

Further, that each maintenance item has to zero or 1 parent maintenance items, which must be related to the same maintenance program.

The check constraint says that a given maintenance item may not be its own parent.

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definately your top schema is what I was after. Needs to be a many to many relationship. Thank you! –  Reafidy Sep 13 '11 at 0:35

Why do you think Option 2 is best practices? If they must be the same, it makes no sense to put them in different columns. Option 1 is the better of the 2.

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That was just my uneducated thoughts, thanks for your help. –  Reafidy Sep 12 '11 at 23:37

Option 1 is the best answer, you can reference the child to the parent (and enforce referential integrity). In addition, if you are using SQL Server 2005 or higher you can use a recursive CTE to build the heirarchy of parent/children if needed for menus, dropdowns, etc.

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Thanks Wil, the recursive CTE will probably be my next hurdle. –  Reafidy Sep 13 '11 at 0:34

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