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still giving problem

I have the following code. As long as I am in try { } it writes fine. But when there is an error, it doesn't write to log file. Not sure why

 private static void jk(string kName, string path)
        {
            Job job;


            try
            {
             // run some functions here and then write to the file
               StreamWriter LJ = new StreamWriter("C:\\Lob.txt");
            LJ.WriteLine("XXXXXXXXXXXX");

            LJ.Close();   
            }
            catch (InvalidException)
            {
               StreamWriter LJ = new StreamWriter("C:\\Lob.txt");
                LJ.WriteLine("YYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY");
                LJ.Close();
                Console.WriteLine("Error: ");
                return;
            }


        }
share|improve this question
    
Is IncalidException in the actual code, or is that a typo? – Adam Liss Sep 13 '11 at 1:13
    
Does it actually create the "Lob.txt" file? Could it be that the StreamWriter cannot actually create the file and it is throwing? – Matt Sep 13 '11 at 2:08
    
it creates the file – Autolycus Sep 13 '11 at 2:20
    
Is there an exception being thrown inside the catch block? If so, what is the exception? Does the catch block execute successfully and still doesn't write anything to the file? – Matt Sep 13 '11 at 7:48
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Because the only thing in your try is writing to the stream... and that's the same thing you try to do in the cacth. Why would that work?

share|improve this answer
    
no I am trying to log YYYYYYY if try fails – Autolycus Sep 13 '11 at 1:29
    
Right. and if yout try fails, writing to that same stream will not work. That's what caused the failure in the first place. – Andrew Barber Sep 13 '11 at 1:33
    
so should I have a totally new stream in the exception? Not sure if thats what you meant – Autolycus Sep 13 '11 at 1:36
    
Well, yeah... that's kinda what I meant. The stream broke. that's why you are in the catch in the first place. So you can't try to write to the same stream. – Andrew Barber Sep 13 '11 at 1:40
    
k sure. Will try it and let you know in a few – Autolycus Sep 13 '11 at 1:45

The catch block executes only when the try block throws the exception (which appears to be a typo in the original post).

If the try succeeds, the catch is never executed.

If the try fails, it's because of a problem that must have occurred in writing to the log. When the catch executes, that problem most likely still exists, so the log within the catch will fail also.

share|improve this answer
    
try fails because of some other problems but I am trying to log it into the file – Autolycus Sep 13 '11 at 1:30

Well, I don't know what type LJ is, and I certainly have never heard of a IncalidException. I am assuming that you just typed the code into the editor incorrectly. You should really just paste it in to avoid those types of errors.

Anyway, there are a few options:

  1. LJ.WriteLine is not throwing an exception.
  2. LJ.WriteLine is throwing an exception, but not of the same type you are catching (i.e., see if it works when you just catch { }).
  3. The second call to LJ.WriteLine is also throwing an exception and you are catching (and perhaps swallowing) it further up the stack.
share|improve this answer
    
please see updated question. It still doesnt work4 – Autolycus Sep 13 '11 at 1:50
    
It will if you actually check those three things, specifically #3. If that code fails once why would you assume that the second time around it will work? Don't just add more code that is going to fail in your catch block. – Ed S. Sep 13 '11 at 3:05
    
I see where the confusion is...try suppose to run a fucntion and only if that function cant be run then it falls in exception. in try I am just logging to see if it made to that function. And if not, I am logging it in the exception – Autolycus Sep 13 '11 at 3:25

With your comment:

try fails because of some other problems but I am trying to log it into the file

I assume that the exception is not thrown by LJ.WriteLine("XXXXXXXXXXXX");

If that's the case, you might just need to flush the StreamWriter. Try declaring LJ in a using block like this:

using (StreamWriter LJ = new StreamWriter("C:\\Lob.txt"))
{
    LJ.WriteLine("XXXXXXXXXXXX");

    try
    {
        ...
        LJ.WriteLine("XXXXXXXXXXXX");
    }
    catch (InvalidException)
    {
        LJ.WriteLine("YYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY");
        Console.WriteLine("Error: ");
        return;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Calling Close should flush the StreamWriter, assuming it gets that far... :) – Matt Sep 13 '11 at 2:33
    
I answered before I saw the current edit. The previous version didn't have LJ.Close(). :) – lonewolf Sep 13 '11 at 2:51

Are you able to compile this code?

There are two things I see incorrect with the above.

  1. It should be InvalidException not IncalidException

        try
        {
            LJ.WriteLine("XXXXXXXXXXXX");
    
        }
        catch (InvalidException e)
        {
            LJ.WriteLine("YYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY");
            Console.WriteLine("Error: {0}", e.Message);
            return;
        }
    
share|improve this answer
1  
Point 2 is incorrect. If you don't need to reference the exception, catch(InvalidException) { } is perfectly valid. – lonewolf Sep 13 '11 at 1:25
1  
Btw, it was not me who gave you the -1. – lonewolf Sep 13 '11 at 1:53
    
No worries, I don't understand the point system yet nor why I should really care, I just enjoy being able help whenever possible. If it doesn't help then fine, I'd want the correct answers to go to the top because ultimately that's why I use the site. – Magnum Sep 14 '11 at 0:35
    
The points allow you to brag that you're famous on the Internet. Seriously though, it's just a system for measuring how much you know stuff. People tend to take you more seriously if you have a high enough reputation/points. – lonewolf Sep 14 '11 at 5:55

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