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I'm trying to see if Moq is something I'd like to use in a new project as the other mocking frameworks I've used are challenging IMHO. So for instance, I have a method as such:

IEnumerable<PickList> GetPickLists();

I'm not sure how I'm supposed to mock this... I've tried something like this, but I'm getting compliation errors (I know the following Returns() isn't correct, but can't figure out what to put in the Returns body:

var mockCrm = new Mock<ICrmProvider>();
mockCrm.Setup<IEnumerable<PickList>>(foo => foo.GetPickLists())

Also, trying to mock something like these two methods:

CustomerSyncResult ApplyActions(IEnumerable<CustomerAction> actions);
IEnumerable<Customer> GetCustomers(IEnumerable<string> crmIDs, IEnumerable<string> emails);

I know I'm asking a blanket question, but I'm having a heck of a time getting started. The CHM in the download doesn't have enough samples for me and some of the tutorials out there seem to be using obsolete methods as well as not covering enumerations which makes it tricky for me :(

Any tips would be greatly appreciated.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted


mockCrm.Setup(x => x.GetPickLists())
    .Returns(new List<PickList>());

The QuickStart is a good reference.

Some examples for the other methods:

mockCrm.Setup(x => x.ApplyActions(It.IsAny<IEnumerable>()))
    .Returns(new CustomerSyncResult());

mockCrm.Setup(x => x.GetCustomers(It.IsAny<IEnumerable>(),
    .Returns(new List<Customers>());

As an aside, make the IEnumerable generic in your original interface for better type safety.

You can also use the new Moq v4 functional specifications:

var list = new List<PickList> { new PickList() };

ICrmProvider crm =
        x =>
        x.GetPickLists() == list);

That is not as well documented currently. Note that you no longer have to write mock.Object. Some links:

The exact syntax (using It.Is, the contents of the lists, etc.) will depend on what you're trying to accomplish. It.IsAny will match any argument, which will make things easier when dealing with sequence or collection parameters.

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Awesome... thanks! Starting to gel... –  Andrew Connell Sep 13 '11 at 2:39
Stick with it; it's a great library. You can import the DLLs into LINQPad and play around with mocking types if you like. –  TrueWill Sep 13 '11 at 2:51
Followup question... what if the object you're mocking requires parameters in the constructor. For instance: public CustomerSyncEngine(ILoggingProvider loggingProvider, ICrmProvider crmProvider, ICacheProvider cacheProvider) How do you get the constructor's params in there? –  Andrew Connell Sep 13 '11 at 10:42
The way I'm handling objects that have params in constructors is to do the older new=Mock<object> syntax... I assume Mock.Of<> can handle it too... –  Andrew Connell Sep 13 '11 at 13:01
@AC - Mock.Of handles a subset of the syntax. I'd suggest asking that on Moq Discussions. Unless you need to override virtual methods, I would create a concrete CustomerSyncEngine (using the new keyword) and pass in mocks for the constructor arguments. –  TrueWill Sep 13 '11 at 14:21

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