Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm calling the destructor to deallocate memory but it is not deleting my object. What is the reason behind it?

my code is like this:

class A
{
public: 
    int a;
    A()
    {
        cout << "a" << endl;
    }
};

class B :public A
{
public: 
    int b;
    B()
    {
        cout << "b" << endl; a = 10; b = 20;
    }
    ~B()
    {
        cout << a << b << endl;
    }
};

and I am using it like:

int main()
{
    {
        B b;
        b.~B();
        b.b=100;  // why this step is executed?
    }
    int x;
    cin>>x;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
You only called the destructor, you didn't use delete. No memory got deallocated here. – Hans Passant Sep 13 '11 at 2:10
    
What are you actually trying to do? Apart from cleaning up after placement new there aren't a lot of reasons to explicitly destroy an object... – Darren Engwirda Sep 13 '11 at 2:12
1  
Why the heck are you calling the destructor explicitly in the first place? And what do you expect to happen? The object was created on the stack and will not be popped off until you exit the scope it was declared in, so in your trivial case nothing bad is going to happen even if you operate on the object after calling the destructor. Also, after executing b.b=100; the compiler is going to call the destructor again because that is end of b's lifetime (demarcated by the {}). – Praetorian Sep 13 '11 at 2:21

i m calling destructor to deallocate memory

Why? Destructor does not deallocate memory occupied by the object. Never did.

A non-trivial destructor ends object's lifetime, but it doesn't end the object's storage duration. This means that memory remains allocated, it just becomes "raw" (uninitialized). So, in that sense it is destroying your object.

Meanwhile, a trivial destructor has no effect at all. Even if you call it explicitly, the object's lifetime does not end.

In your case the destructor B::~B is non-trivial though, which formally means that by calling it you ended your object's lifetime. You destroyed it as much a local object can be destroyed. But the memory remains. Attempting to access that memory as a B object simply leads to undefined behavior.

In fact, there's no way to manually deallocate memory occupied by a local object. Local memory is always deallocated automatically.

share|improve this answer
6  
+1 for the Metallica reference :-) – Praetorian Sep 13 '11 at 2:30
1  
too bad the video has been removed :\ – Marson Mao Feb 19 '14 at 5:58
    
@AnT: I tried ideone.com/Oz0yoF this program. It gives me correct value of 9 as an outcome + 2 destructor calls. So, can I say that memory for an object still allocated for an test class object but it just may become "raw". So, it is undefined behavior to call t.get_a() after explicitly calling destructor & again when block is subsequently left in a manner that would ordinarily invoke implicit destruction of the object. right? – Destructor Jul 7 '15 at 13:02
1  
@Pravasi Meet: Storage duration of your object is not terminated by the destructor call, meaning that the memory is still allocated. The lifetime of the object is over though, which means that calling get_a() on it is undefined. – AnT Jul 7 '15 at 14:51

You do not call a destructor like that (well, you can but it's generally not done).

For automatic variables like your b, the destructor will be called at some point when the variable goes out of scope. You don't ever need to call the destructor explicitly.

For objects allocated on the heap with new, the destructor will be called after you delete them. In this case, you also don't call the destructor explicitly.

C++03 states in 12.4 Destructors:

Destructors are invoked implicitly:

  • for a constructed object with static storage duration (3.7.1) at program termination;
  • for a constructed object with automatic storage duration (3.7.2) when the block in which the object is created exits;
  • for a constructed temporary object when the lifetime of the temporary object ends;
  • for a constructed object allocated by a new-expression, through use of a delete-expression;
  • in several situations due to the handling of exceptions.

Destructors can also be invoked explicitly.

Note: explicit calls of destructors are rarely needed. One use of such calls is for objects placed at specific addresses using a new-expression with the placement option. Such use of explicit placement and destruction of objects can be necessary to cope with dedicated hardware resources and for writing memory management facilities.

You especially don't do what you're trying to do since the destructor will be called twice, once explicitly by you and once implicitly when b goes out of scope. From that same section of the standard:

Once a destructor is invoked for an object, the object no longer exists; the behavior is undefined if the destructor is invoked for an object whose lifetime has ended. Example: if the destructor for an automatic object is explicitly invoked, and the block is subsequently left in a manner that would ordinarily invoke implicit destruction of the object, the behavior is undefined.

This text remains unchanged in the latest draft of C++11 that I have (n3225, November 2010) and it's unlikely it would have changed in essence between that and approval in August 2011.

share|improve this answer
    
For an object allocated with new you can call the destructor explicitly, and then call operator delete to free the memory, can't you? Or would that be invoking undefined behavior? (I'm not saying you should do this, but technically, is it possible?) – Praetorian Sep 13 '11 at 2:52

What you're doing is actually invoking undefined behavior ... just because you've called the destructor, does not mean that the memory is zeroed out or necessarily "reclaimed" and inaccessable (especially in the case of an automatic variable that was allocated on the stack and not the heap). It could be, but that is left up to the implementation, and typically that is not done due to performance reasons, which is typically the reason for using C++ in the first place. Therefore you can theoretically access the values at the memory address that the object was occupying after calling the destructor ... but again, it's undefined behavior, and you can run into pretty much anything from a segmentation fault, to a silent error that corrupts memory somewhere else, etc.

share|improve this answer

It's executed because you wrote the code that said you wanted it to happen. The compiler is simply doing what you told it to do.

What you're doing probably doesn't "deallocate memory," as you suggested it would. Instead, it just calls the destructor. Destructors don't deallocate the memory occupied by the objects they're called on. They deallocate memory allocated by the object (such as by calling destructors of member variables, or calling free or delete on other things), but the memory of the object itself is deallocated elsewhere, either by the internal workings of the delete statement, or by the compiler when cleaning up automatic variables (which is what your B b declaration represents). Even the closing of the scope block probably doesn't deallocate any memory for b; compilers usually figure out how much stack space they'll need for an entire subroutine and allocate it all upon entry. The memory occupied by that B object is reserved for b upon entry to the inner scope, and upon exit, the destructor is called automatically.

share|improve this answer

Why wouldn't? Your object has been destroyed but its memory space is still around until it goes out of scope, where it will be destroyed again by the way. It's undefined behavior to do what you do.

share|improve this answer

Destructors were not designed to call them explicitly. Basically it is just another (special) method of class. If you want to Uninitialize your object and then still be able to use it you could make our own method:

class B: public A
{
public:
 int b;
 B() {cout<<"b"<<endl;a=10;b=20;}
 ~B() {Release(); cout<<a<<b<<endl;}
 void Release() { cout<<"Releasing B"; b = 0; }
};

int main()
{
    {
      B b;
      b.Release();
      b.b=100;  // why this step is executed?
    }
    int x;
    cin>>x;
    return 0;
}

Otherwise B will be deleted when out of scope:

int main()
{
    {
      B b;
      b.b = 100;  //OK
    }
    b.b = 100; //compile time error
    int x;
    cin>>x;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.