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I am trying to write a C program in Linux to send and receive data from a microcontroller over the serial port. As a test, I have configured the microcontroller to immediately echo all characters sent. I have verified that this works in minicom and also by using "cat" and "echo" to send and receive data.

However, when I try to do the same in a C program, my read call blocks forever. I am setting the serial port to non-canonical mode, with a MIN of '1' and TIME of '0'. My minicom test proves that the microcontroller is returning characters as they are typed, so I expect read to return after the write call has sent characters. I have compared my code to several online examples, and I haven't found anything that I am missing. I have tried several permutations of the code below with no luck. Can someone spot the problem?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <termios.h>

#define UART_SPEED B115200

char buf[512];

void init_serial (int fd)
{
    struct termios termios;
    int res;

    res = tcgetattr (fd, &termios);
    if (res < 0) {
        fprintf (stderr, "Termios get error: %s\n", strerror (errno));
        exit (-1);
    }

    cfsetispeed (&termios, UART_SPEED);
    cfsetospeed (&termios, UART_SPEED);

    termios.c_iflag &= ~(IGNPAR | IXON | IXOFF);
    termios.c_iflag |= IGNPAR;

    termios.c_cflag &= ~(CSIZE | PARENB | CSTOPB | CREAD | CLOCAL);
    termios.c_cflag |= CS8;
    termios.c_cflag |= CREAD;
    termios.c_cflag |= CLOCAL;

    termios.c_lflag &= ~(ICANON | ECHO);
    termios.c_cc[VMIN] = 1;
    termios.c_cc[VTIME] = 0;

    res = tcsetattr (fd, TCSANOW, &termios);
    if (res < 0) {
        fprintf (stderr, "Termios set error: %s\n", strerror (errno));
        exit (-1);
    }
}

int main (int argc, char **argv)
{
    int fd;
    int res;
    int i;

    if (argc < 2) {
        fprintf (stderr, "Please enter device name\n");
        return -1;
    }

    fd = open (argv[1], O_RDWR | O_NOCTTY);
    if (fd < 0) {
        fprintf (stderr, "Cannot open %s: %s\n", argv[1], strerror(errno));
        return -1;
    }

    init_serial (fd);

    res = write (fd, "P=20\r\n", 6);
    if (res < 0) {
        fprintf (stderr, "Write error: %s\n", strerror(errno));
        return -1;
    }
    tcdrain (fd);

    res = read (fd, buf, 512);
    printf ("%d\n", res);
    if (res < 0) {
        fprintf (stderr, "Read error: %s\n", strerror(errno));
        return -1;
    }

    for (i=0; i<res; i++) {
        printf ("%c", buf[i]);
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Worth confirming using a loopback serial cable. Code as stated above works for me. –  Andrew Edgecombe Sep 13 '11 at 3:17
    
Since it seems to work for Andrew, I suggest you try tweaking the control lines (CRTSCTS). Also: maybe the remote side is more picky on the parity than you are, too and does not echo. If you still own a break-out box: use it. –  wildplasser Sep 13 '11 at 8:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You might want to insert some delays, or loop waiting for input.

After setting the bit rate, some types of UART hardware takes one or two characters at the new speed to synchronize to the new speed. It is possible the first few characters are being lost on the write.

After the six character write, the read is issued immediately with a 0.1 second timeout. It is possible that not all the characters from the write() have finished being transmitted before the read(), let alone any time for the remote device to respond.

For example, one solution is:

init_serial (fd);
usleep (100000);   // delay 0.1 seconds (Linux) so term parameters have time to change

res = write (fd, "P=20\r\n", 6);
if (res < 0) {
    fprintf (stderr, "Write error: %s\n", strerror(errno));
    return -1;
}
tcdrain (fd);
usleep (250000);  // delay 0.25 for device to respond and return data

res = read (fd, buf, 512);

Another approach would be to continue reading until a sufficient number of characters arrive or a reasonable amount of time passes.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the feedback. However, with TIME=0 and MIN=1, my read call is blocked waiting for any feedback. It's not returning 0 (not returning at all), so loops won't help. More characters to allow the serial to stabilize seems like a good idea, though. I'll try increasing the write size to see if it helps. –  FazJaxton Sep 14 '11 at 2:15
    
You were right, it was the delays! I put in a delay of 0.5 seconds and it didn't work, but 2 seconds seems to work every time. I will implement a smarter test to wait for the connection to be ready, but this simple test has proven the problem. I'm really surprised that Linux works this way (requires you to manually wait, and drops IO in the meantime), but I'm glad to have it solved. Thanks again! –  FazJaxton Sep 14 '11 at 3:24
    
@FazJaxton: By having Linux behave with great responsiveness—which is really what the cause is—you can use that as a fundamental basis for emulating Windows' behavior, for example. –  wallyk Sep 14 '11 at 3:46

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