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I'd like to use a stack and return a path, but I'm thinking it's not possible.

A node must be called directly by its parent so that it can receive the path behind it, whereas when this node is pushed onto a stack, it loses the path so far. Using a stack would result in a node being evaluated in isolation, and I couldn't pass the path to the node's parent through to the node.

I can't let nodes have the property of the path behind them, since it's a homework assignment.

I've been stumped on this one for over a week!

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Can it be done using recursion? How is using an explicit stack different than using the implicit stack created with recursion? How can a recursion stack be emulated? –  user166390 Sep 13 '11 at 4:29
    
I think what I have right now is an implicit stack. Nodes are pushed and immediately popped, so it's not really making use of the stack itself. I was imagining that a node's children would all be added at once, then the deepening would continue. –  michael.greenwald Sep 13 '11 at 4:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Whenever you pop a node from the stack, you need a way of retrieving the path that led to that node.

One solution is push tuples of (node, path) on the stack instead of just node values. If path is a purely functional list like in Haskell, this is a good solution, but in Python it may not be as idiomatic. Also while the path strictly speaking isn't stored within the node, this solution probably isn't in the spirit of the question.

Another solution is to maintain a separate stack that contains the path to the previously visited node. The depth-first stack contains tuples of (node, depth) where depth is the depth of the node in the search. Before adding node to the end of the path, elements are popped from the path until the length of the path equals depth.

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"A node must be called directly by its parent so that it can receive the path behind it," <- This seems okay.

whereas when this node is pushed onto a stack, it loses the path so far. <- This isn't anything to worry about I believe.

What you can do is to recursively build up the stack with something like

def makepath(someGraph, from, to):
    if(from == to)
        return ""

    nextNode= <...> #find out next node in path here
    return makepath(someGraph, nextNode, to) + str(nextNode)
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