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For example:

abc
xyz
123
546

input.txt:

asdad
asdad
adghf
dfytr

I wanted to add the above column in 2nd column. The expected output is given below.

output.txt:

asdad  abc
asdad  xyz
adghf  123
dfytr  567
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

paste is the easiest solution. Here's an awk example that doesn't have to store the entire first file in memory:

awk '{getline second < "example"; printf("%s\t%s\n",$0,second)}' input.txt
share|improve this answer

The command you're looking for is paste rather than awk. You could do it in awk but you'll probably find that paste is easier:

pax> cat qq1
asdad
asdad
adghf
dfytr

pax> cat qq2
abc
xyz
123
546

pax> paste qq1 qq2
asdad   abc
asdad   xyz
adghf   123
dfytr   546

Use paste -d' ' qq1 qq2 if you want a space rather than a tab for the delimiter.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks paxdiablo – Suyog Sakegaonkar Sep 13 '11 at 5:06

You can use just bash

exec 4<file2
while read -r line1
do
 read -r line2 <&4
 echo $line $line2
 done < file1
exec 4>&-
share|improve this answer
    
This should work in other sh-like shells, too, not just bash. You should precede the reads with IFS= , though. Also, you should check your edge cases: if the last line of file1 doesn't end with \n, I think the while-block here won't be executed for it. – dubiousjim Apr 19 '12 at 4:38

In awk:

awk 'NR==FNR {x[NR] = $0} NR != FNR {print x[FNR], $0}' col1_file col2_file

Though its probably better to use paste

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