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I have written a program according to a specification.
The Specification has about 3 types and each type gets handled differently on every single point.

That means more or less for code readability, I have written it like shown below, now my question is, if you have 200 such statements, wouldn't it be worth to merge them all into one "if enum-type x"

I would believe there is a program out there which already does it but google didn't help me much for this specific problem. Thanks for help in advance.

/* Point 1.15 Filling Customers bdate */

if(current.identifier == APPLE){ output.setValue(1.15, additionalObj.some.color)}
if(current.identifier == PLUM){ output.setValue(1.15, otherObj.another.color) }
if(current.identifier == GRAPE){ output.setValue(1.15, default::color) }


/* Point 1.16 Filling Customers cash*/

if(current.identifier == APPLE){ do whatever}
if(current.identifier == PLUM){ do whatever}
if(current.identifier == GRAPE){ do whatever}

Result to be achieved:

if(current.identifier == APPLE){ output.setValue(1.15, additionalObj.some.color) 
                                 do whatever
}

And so on so i can merge them into 1 statement automatically while i still have the readable code

Edit: I might have misinformed you, its actually not a type its just an Object with a String identifier and SubObjects so i can't use polymorphism. I have adjusted the above so you can see what i would like to achieve.

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5  
Since you're using C++ why aren't you just using OO capabilities like polymorphism to handle this ? –  Paul R Sep 13 '11 at 6:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Basic polymorphic approach:

enum Type { tX, tY, tZ};

struct Data
{
    Type type;
    int data_;
};

class Processor
{

public:

    virtual void fillCustomersBDate(const Data& data) = 0; 
    virtual void fillCustomersCash(const Data& data) = 0;

};

class XProcessor : public Processor 
{
    virtual void fillCustomersBDate(const Data& data) { /* X stuff */}
    virtual void fillCustomersCash(const Data& data) {/* X stuff */}
};
class YProcessor : public Processor 
{
    virtual void fillCustomersBDate(const Data& data) {/* Y stuff */}
    virtual void fillCustomersCash(const Data& data) {/* Y stuff */}
};

void process(const Data& data)
{
    Processor* processor = processorForType(data.type);
    // Do general stuff
    processor->fillCustomersBDate(data);
    // Do general stuff
    processor->fillCustomersCash(data);
    // Do general stuff
    delete processor;
}

More likely, you'd move most of the main flow into the base class.

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Thanks for your solution, my problem is that it would require me to create 200 functions on each, so i would have to write 600 methods , 3 types x 200 functions per object –  Oliver Stutz Sep 13 '11 at 9:06
    
@Oliver Stutz. Its not obviously wrong to create that many methods. If the methods for distinct "types" are really different, and each does something clear like "fillCustomersBDate", then do it. You may be able to aggregate some, if there is not common code b/w the method calls. If the implementation is really the "same" for different then there may be other template based solutions. We'd need to see more real code to be clearer. –  Keith Sep 14 '11 at 1:02
    
Thanks for your answer, for me it is important that the code performs well, with 600 different methods it will not, i can save a lot of effort and system performance by having if(x) { do this, and that andthis ect } as opposed to if(x) { do this } if (x) { do that} and so on. I know you want to see code, but still iam asking for a simple thing, merging the same condition statements eg, if(x) will be only once and everything which checks this condition is merged within so that performance to check x is safed –  Oliver Stutz Sep 14 '11 at 8:00

Read about C++ class inheritance and polymorphism if you have not understood them already. These two features of C++ will provide a more elegant way to solve your problem.

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@(Upvoters): Just want to say thanks to all upvoters to this short, example-less answer. Your upvotes has gain me the privilege to "comment everywhere". Please do upvote Keith's answer for he has provided a simple example. –  ksming Sep 13 '11 at 9:25

There's two ways I would to do this: the first is by polymorphic behaviour (either via virtual functions, or type parameterization); the second would be to switch on the type.

For the first one, each of the type can inherit from a common (possibly abstract) base class:

class Base
{
public:

    virtual void DoSomething( ) =0;

};

class A : public Base
{
public:
    void DoSomething( )
    {
        cout << "I'm doing something from A!" << endl;
    }
};

class B : public Base
{
public:
    void DoSomething( )
    {
        cout << "I'm doing something from B!" << endl;
    }
};

This way, you can simply use a variable of type Base &, Base *, or any smart pointer of Base (e.g. shared_ptr<Base), and call the DoSomething method on that variable. The correct implementation of DoSomething would be called based on the run-time type of the variable (since DoSomething is a virtual method).

Another way to acheive similar behaviour is via templates. It's used in a similar way as the first suggestion, but you don't need a base class, and the methods need not be virtual:

class A
{
public:
    void DoSomething( )
    {
        cout << "I'm doing something from A!" << endl;
    }
};

class B
{
public:
    void DoSomething( )
    {
        cout << "I'm doing something from B!" << endl;
    }
};

Then the function which handles the operations can be defined something like this:

template<typename T>
void PolymorphicDoSomething( T variable )
{
    T.DoSomething( );
}

and used like this:

A a;
PolymorphicDoSomething( a );

Of course, this example is a little contrived, but that's the fundamental idea, and can be very useful depending on the situation.

The other possibility would be to essentially do what you're doing now, but with a single switch statement, rather than several if statements. If the type of the variable is stored as an enum or an int, you can use a switch to efficiently determine which operations to perform:

enum VariableType
{
    TypeA,
    TypeB,
    TypeC,
    // etc.
};

//...

switch(variable_type)
{
case TypeA:
    DoSomethingForA( );
    break;
case TypeB:
    DoSomethingForB( );
    break;
case TypeC:
    DoSomethingForC( );
    break;
// etc.
}

But I doubt that this would really be any more effective than using virtual methods. Also, virtual methods are more managable - in order to extend the functionality, you must simply declare another class, and all the code you already have will be able to cope with it. In the case of a switch, you would have to add a case statement everywhere you check the variable's type. So I would really stick with virtual methods in this case.

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the efficiency is exactly my problem, iam trying to get rid of repeating control mechanisms, instead of building more method calls ect. eg (if(x == true),do x, if(x == true), do that ect, it should be all in one, once the x == true and all the sub statements, thats why i asked for a merging tool, which could refit my code automatically so that i will remain with easy visible code –  Oliver Stutz Sep 13 '11 at 9:07

If they're all distinct, you can separate them into individual sections like:

if (type x)
    processX1v1_thru_1v15(); // will do all steps 1.1 thru 1.16 for type x
else if (type y)
    processY1v1_thru_1v15(); // will do all steps 1.1 thru 1.16 for type y
: : :
and so on.

But you may want to look into polymorphism which will allow you to specify a different "whatever" for each class/type. The you can just do domething like:

obj.doWhatever1_01();  // calls obj-specific method depending on type.
obj.doWhatever1_02();
: : :
obj.doWhatever1_16();
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