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I have read article at https://developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/element.addEventListener but unable to understand useCapture attribute.Defination there is-

If true, useCapture indicates that the user wishes to initiate capture. After initiating capture, all events of the specified type will be dispatched to the registered listener before being dispatched to any EventTargets beneath it in the DOM tree. Events which are bubbling upward through the tree will not trigger a listener designated to use capture.

In this code parent event triggers before child,so I am not able to understand its behavior.Document object has usecapture true and child div has usecapture set false and document usecapture is followed.So why document property is preferred over child.

<html>
<head>
<script>
function load()
{
document.addEventListener("click",function(){alert("parent event")},true);
document.getElementById("div1").addEventListener("click",function(){alert("child event")},false);
}
</script>
</head>
<body onload="load()">
<div id="div1">click me</div>
</body>
</html>
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7 Answers 7

up vote 106 down vote accepted

Events can be activated at two occasions: At the beginning ("capture"), and at the end ("bubble"). Events are executed in the order of how they're defined. Say, you define 4 event listeners:

window.addEventListener("click", function(){alert(1)}, false);
window.addEventListener("click", function(){alert(2)}, true);
window.addEventListener("click", function(){alert(3)}, false);
window.addEventListener("click", function(){alert(4)}, true);

The alert boxes will pop up in this order:

  • 2 (defined first, using capture=true)
  • 4 (defined second using capture=true)
  • 1 (first defined event with capture=false)
  • 3 (second defined event with capture=false)
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19  
Order of execution is not guaranteed: no specification is made as to the order in which they will receive the event with regards to the other EventListeners on the EventTarget. I haven't tested all browsers, so they may all just happen to implement it the same way. Capture events will, however, be done before non-capturing events. –  tjameson Aug 20 '13 at 0:56
5  
@tjameson The order of execution is guaranteed in the successor to the DOM2 spec, DOM3 events: "the implementation must determine the current target's candidate event listeners. This must be the list of all event listeners that have been registered on the current target in their order of registration." –  Rob W Sep 12 at 20:47

I find this diagram is very useful for understanding the capture/target/bubble phases: http://www.w3.org/TR/2003/NOTE-DOM-Level-3-Events-20031107/events.html#Events-phases

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Capture Event vs Bubble Event

  • Capture Event will be dispatch before Bubble Event
  • Event propagation order is
    1. Parent Capture
    2. Children Capture
    3. Children Bubble
    4. Parent Bubble

( stopPropagation() will stop the flow )

                  |  A
 -----------------|--|-----------------
 | Parent         |  |                |
 |   -------------|--|-----------     |
 |   |Children    V  |          |     |
 |   ----------------------------     |
 |                                    |
 --------------------------------------

Demo

<div id="parent">
    <div id="children">
        Click
    </div>
</div>


<script>
var parent = document.getElementById('parent'),
    children = document.getElementById('children');

children.addEventListener('click', function (e) { 
    alert('Children Capture');
    // e.stopPropagation();
}, true);

children.addEventListener('click', function (e) { 
    alert('Children Bubble');
    // e.stopPropagation();
}, false);

parent.addEventListener('click', function (e) { 
    alert('Parent Capture');
    // e.stopPropagation();
}, true);

parent.addEventListener('click', function (e) { 
    alert('Parent Bubble');
    // e.stopPropagation();
}, false);
</script>
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When you say useCapture = true the Events execute top to down in the capture phase when false it does a bubble bottom to top.

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It's all about event models: http://www.w3.org/TR/DOM-Level-2-Events/events.html#Events-flow You can catch event in bubbling phase or in capturing phase. Your choice.
Take a look at http://www.quirksmode.org/js/events_order.html - you'll find it very useful.

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links to w3 are as or even less useful than google search i cant understand anything there. –  Muhammad Umer Jul 8 '13 at 2:04
    
Yeah, that w3 link is just a huge bunch of words, but opposite to it, that second link to quirksmode site explains the topic very well and briefly. –  Stano Aug 7 '13 at 14:24

The order of definition only matters if the items are at the same level. If you reverse the order of definition in your code you will get the same results.

However, if you reverse the useCapture setting on the two event handlers, the child event handler responds before that of the parent. The reason for this is that the child event handler will now be triggered in the capture phase which is prior to the bubbling phase in which the parent event handler will be triggered.

If you set useCapture to true for both event handlers--regardless of order of definition--the parent event handler will be triggered first because it comes before the child in the capturing phase.

Conversely, if you set useCapture to false for both event handlers--again regardless of order of definition--the child event handler will be triggered first because it comes before the parent in the bubbling phase.

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Code example:

<div id="div1" style="background:#9595FF">
  Outer Div<br />
  <div id="div2" style="background:#FFFFFF">
    Inner Div
  </div>
</div>

Javascript code:

d1 = document.getElementById("div1");
d2 = document.getElementById("div2");

if both are set to false

d1.addEventListener('click',function(){alert("Div 1")},false);
d2.addEventListener('click',function(){alert("Div 2")},false);

Executes: Onclicking Inner Div, alerts are displayed as: Div 2 > Div 1

Here the script is executed from the inner element: Event Bubbling (useCapture has been set to false)

div 1 is set to true and div 2 set to false

d1.addEventListener('click',function(){alert("Div 1")},true);
d2.addEventListener('click',function(){alert("Div 2")},false);

Executes: Onclicking Inner Div, alerts are displayed as: Div 1 > Div 2

Here the script is executed from the ancestor / outer element: Event Capturing (useCapture has been set to true)

div 1 is set to false and div 2 set to true

d1.addEventListener('click',function(){alert("Div 1")},false);
d2.addEventListener('click',function(){alert("Div 2")},true);

Executes: Onclicking Inner Div, alerts are displayed as: Div 2 > Div 1

Here the script is executed from the inner element: Event Bubbling (useCapture has been set to false)

div 1 is set to true and div 2 set to true

d1.addEventListener('click',function(){alert("Div 1")},true);
d2.addEventListener('click',function(){alert("Div 2")},true);

Executes: Onclicking Inner Div, alerts are displayed as: Div 1 > Div 2

Here the script is executed from the ancestor / outer element: Event Capturing since useCapture has been set to true

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