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I've got a byte array that was created using a hash function. I would like to convert this array into a string. So far so good, it will give me hexadecimal string.

Now I would like to use something different than hexadecimal characters, I would like to encode the byte array with these 36 characters: [a-z][0-9].

How would I go about?

Edit: the reason I would to do this, is because I would like to have a smaller string, than a hexadecimal string.

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Do you wan't to reencode it to the a char array contains the ascii of this byte array or to a new string that uses only those charachters? –  Seffix Sep 13 '11 at 7:54
    
The byte array seems to make more sense ;-). –  Kees C. Bakker Sep 13 '11 at 7:55
    
you mean convert each hex number to an ascii char? –  thumbmunkeys Sep 13 '11 at 7:55
    
Removed the example, makes the question look different. –  Kees C. Bakker Sep 13 '11 at 7:58
1  
What you want is called base 36... It's quite complex to do it :-) But it can be done. –  xanatos Sep 13 '11 at 8:02

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I adapted my arbitrary-length base conversion function from this answer to C#:

static string BaseConvert(string number, int fromBase, int toBase)
{
    var digits = "0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
    var length = number.Length;
    var result = string.Empty;

    var nibbles = number.Select(c => digits.IndexOf(c)).ToList();
    int newlen;
    do {
        var value = 0;
        newlen = 0;

        for (var i = 0; i < length; ++i) {
            value = value * fromBase + nibbles[i];
            if (value >= toBase) {
                if (newlen == nibbles.Count) {
                    nibbles.Add(0);
                }
                nibbles[newlen++] = value / toBase;
                value %= toBase;
            }
            else if (newlen > 0) {
                if (newlen == nibbles.Count) {
                    nibbles.Add(0);
                }
                nibbles[newlen++] = 0;
            }
        }
        length = newlen;
        result = digits[value] + result; //
    }
    while (newlen != 0);

    return result;
}

As it's coming from PHP it might not be too idiomatic C#, there are also no parameter validity checks. However, you can feed it a hex-encoded string and it will work just fine with

var result = BaseConvert(hexEncoded, 16, 36);

It's not exactly what you asked for, but encoding the byte[] into hex is trivial.

See it in action.

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Love the answer! –  Kees C. Bakker Sep 13 '11 at 8:52
    
Why do I get the same answer if I change the digit string to var digits = "0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";? –  Kees C. Bakker Sep 13 '11 at 8:54
    
@Kees: digits is just the digits available for use. To actually make use of the caps you need to pass an appropriately higher base as the second and/or third parameter. –  Jon Sep 13 '11 at 8:58
    
I see... just made digits static and gave the length of it to the function. Perfect solution and very readable. –  Kees C. Bakker Sep 13 '11 at 9:06

If you want a shorter string and can accept [a-zA-Z0-9] and + and / then look at Convert.ToBase64String

share|improve this answer
    
+1 best alternative. However base64 uses additional characters (i thought + and =) –  C.Evenhuis Sep 13 '11 at 8:11
    
Also base64 has [A-Z], so I can't use it. –  Kees C. Bakker Sep 13 '11 at 8:51

Earlier tonight I came across a codereview question revolving around the same algorithm being discussed here. See: http://codereview.stackexchange.com/questions/14084/base-36-encoding-of-a-byte-array/

I provided a improved implementation of one of its earlier answers (both use BigInteger). See: http://codereview.stackexchange.com/a/20014/20654. The solution takes a byte[] and returns a Base36 string. Both the original and mine include simple benchmark information.

For completeness, the following is the method to decode a byte[] from an string. I'll include the encode function from the link above as well. See the text after this code block for some simple benchmark info for decoding.

const int kByteBitCount= 8; // number of bits in a byte
// constants that we use in FromBase36String and ToBase36String
const string kBase36Digits= "0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
static readonly double kBase36CharsLengthDivisor= Math.Log(kBase36Digits.Length, 2);
static readonly BigInteger kBigInt36= new BigInteger(36);

// assumes the input 'chars' is in big-endian ordering, MSB->LSB
static byte[] FromBase36String(string chars)
{
    var bi= new BigInteger();
    for (int x= 0; x < chars.Length; x++)
    {
        int i= kBase36Digits.IndexOf(chars[x]);
        if (i < 0) return null; // invalid character
        bi *= kBigInt36;
        bi += i;
    }

    return bi.ToByteArray();
}

// characters returned are in big-endian ordering, MSB->LSB
static string ToBase36String(byte[] bytes)
{
    // Estimate the result's length so we don't waste time realloc'ing
    int result_length= (int)
        Math.Ceiling(bytes.Length * kByteBitCount / kBase36CharsLengthDivisor);
    // We use a List so we don't have to CopyTo a StringBuilder's characters
    // to a char[], only to then Array.Reverse it later
    var result= new System.Collections.Generic.List<char>(result_length);

    var dividend= new BigInteger(bytes);
    // IsZero's computation is less complex than evaluating "dividend > 0"
    // which invokes BigInteger.CompareTo(BigInteger)
    while (!dividend.IsZero)
    {
        BigInteger remainder;
        dividend= BigInteger.DivRem(dividend, kBigInt36, out remainder);
        int digit_index= Math.Abs((int)remainder);
        result.Add(kBase36Digits[digit_index]);
    }

    // orientate the characters in big-endian ordering
    result.Reverse();
    // ToArray will also trim the excess chars used in length prediction
    return new string(result.ToArray());
}

"A test 1234. Made slightly larger!" encodes to Base64 as "165kkoorqxin775ct82ist5ysteekll7kaqlcnnu6mfe7ag7e63b5"

To decode that Base36 string 1,000,000 times takes 12.6558909 seconds on my machine (I used the same build and machine conditions as provided in my answer on codereview)

You mentioned that you were dealing with a byte[] for the MD5 hash, rather than a hexadecimal string representation of it, so I think this solution provide the least overhead for you.

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Using BigInteger (needs the System.Numerics reference)

const string chars = "0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";

public static byte[] FromBaseN(string str, string chars) {
    // This should be the maximum length of the byte[] array. It's the opposite of the one used
    // in ToBaseN.
    int len = (int)Math.Ceiling(str.Length * Math.Log(chars.Length, 2) / 8);

    var bytes = new List<byte>(len);

    // We strip initial characters that are 'zeros'.
    int i = 0;

    while (i < str.Length && str[i] == chars[0]) {
        i++;
        bytes.Add(0);
    }

    // If the string was composed only of 'zeros', we have finished.
    if (i == str.Length) {
        return bytes.ToArray();
    }

    BigInteger bi = BigInteger.Zero;
    BigInteger length = chars.Length;
    BigInteger mult = BigInteger.One;

    for (int j = str.Length - 1; j >= i; j--) {
        int ix = chars.IndexOf(str[j]);

        // We didn't find the character
        if (ix == -1) {
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
        }

        bi += ix * mult;

        mult *= length;
    }

    var bytes2 = bi.ToByteArray();

    for (int j = bytes2[bytes2.Length - 1] == 0 ? bytes2.Length - 2 : bytes2.Length - 1; j >= 0; j--) {
        bytes.Add(bytes2[j]);
    }

    return bytes.ToArray();
}

public static string ToBaseN(byte[] bytes, string chars) {
    if (bytes.Length == 0) {
        return String.Empty;
    }

    // We try to pre-calc the length of the string. We know the bits of "information"
    // of a byte are 8. Using Log2 we calc the bits of information of our new base. 
    int len = (int)Math.Ceiling(bytes.Length * 8 / Math.Log(chars.Length, 2));

    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(len);

    // We strip initial bytes set to 0. This because 01 == 1, but we are working on
    // binary data, so the initial zeros are important! We will save these zeros "manually"
    int i = 0;

    while (i < bytes.Length && bytes[i] == 0) {
        i++;
    }

    // If the byte array was composed only of zeros, we have finished.
    if (i == bytes.Length) {
        sb.Append(chars[0], i);
        return sb.ToString();
    }

    int newLength = bytes.Length - i;

    // BigInteger saves in the last byte the sign. > 7F negative, <= 7F positive. 
    // If we have a "negative" number, we will prepend a 0 byte.
    // (Here we are working with a pre-Reverse array, so we have to look at the 
    // first byte that will be copied)
    if (bytes[i] > 0x7F) {
        newLength++;
    }

    var bytes2 = new byte[newLength];

    // We reverse the array (and we strip the initial zeros)
    for (int j = bytes.Length - 1, k = 0; j >= i; j--, k++) {
        bytes2[k] = bytes[j];
    }

    BigInteger bi = new BigInteger(bytes2);

    // A little optimization. We will do many divisions based on chars.Length
    BigInteger length = chars.Length;

    while (bi > 0) {
        BigInteger remainder;
        bi = BigInteger.DivRem(bi, length, out remainder);

        sb.Append(chars[(int)remainder]);
    }

    // We append the zeros that we skipped at the beginning
    sb.Append(chars[0], i);

    // We reverse the StringBuilder
    int length2 = sb.Length / 2;

    for (int j = 0, k = sb.Length - 1; j < length2; j++, k--) {
        char ch = sb[j];
        sb[j] = sb[k];
        sb[k] = ch;
    }

    return sb.ToString();
}

Be aware that they are REALLY slow! REALLY REALLY slow! (2 minutes for 100k). To speed them up you would probably need to rewrite the division/mod operation so that they work directly on a buffer, instead of each time recreating the scratch pads as it's done by BigInteger. And it would still be SLOW. The problem is that the time needed to encode the first byte is O(n) where n is the length of the byte array (this because all the array needs to be divided by 36). Unless you want to work with blocks of 5 bytes and lose some bits. Each symbol of Base36 carries around 5.169925001 bits. So 8 of these symbols would carry 41.35940001 bits. Very near 40 bytes.

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1  
Are you sure this gives good results? It gives different results than my solution, which is demonstratably reversible. I used the same "chars" string. –  Jon Sep 13 '11 at 8:35
    
big integer should be created from reverced byte array var bi = new BigInteger(bytes.Concat(new byte[] { 0 }).Reverse().ToArray()); –  hazzik Sep 13 '11 at 8:39
    
@hazzik Done. And I've found another bug with prepended '\0' –  xanatos Sep 13 '11 at 9:03
    
WOW finally an encoding using BigInteger that actually works. Everything else I tried produced unreliable results due to the sign byte. Thanks! –  Shawn Jan 16 at 1:50
System.Text.Encoding enc = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII;
string myString = enc.GetString(myByteArray);

You can play with what encoding you need:

System.Text.ASCIIEncoding,
System.Text.UnicodeEncoding,
System.Text.UTF7Encoding,
System.Text.UTF8Encoding

To match the requrements [a-z][0-9] you can use it:

Byte[] bytes = new Byte[] { 200, 180, 34 };
string result = String.Join("a", bytes.Select(x => x.ToString()).ToArray());

You will have string representation of bytes with char separator. To convert back you will need to split, and convert the string[] to byte[] using the same approach with .Select().

share|improve this answer
    
How does this guarantee that all the characters in the string will be in the range [a-z][0-9]? –  Kees C. Bakker Sep 13 '11 at 7:57
    
Regarding the answer: All of these encodings are valid for the required character range. No need to play. –  Stephan Sep 13 '11 at 8:00
    
It's not guarantee that all of this will be in this range because each byte can represents not only chars and digits. You can save each byte like integer with separator using any characters if you need to match these requrements. It will looks like: 250a244a.... It's just an option how you can match [a-z][0-9]. –  Samich Sep 13 '11 at 8:00

Usually a power of 2 is used - that way one character maps to a fixed number of bits. An alphabet of 32 bits for instance would map to 5 bits. The only challenge in that case is how to deserialize variable-length strings.

For 36 bits you could treat the data as a large number, and then:

  • divide by 36
  • add the remainder as character to your result
  • repeat until the division results in 0

Easier said than done perhaps.

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you can use modulu. this example encode your byte array to string of [0-9][a-z]. change it if you want.

    public string byteToString(byte[] byteArr)
    {
        int i;
        char[] charArr = new char[byteArr.Length];
        for (i = 0; i < byteArr.Length; i++)
        {
            int byt = byteArr[i] % 36; // 36=num of availible charachters
            if (byt < 10)
            {
                charArr[i] = (char)(byt + 48); //if % result is a digit
            }
            else
            {
                charArr[i] = (char)(byt + 87); //if % result is a letter
            }
        }
        return new String(charArr);
    }

If you don't want to lose data for de-encoding you can use this example:

    public string byteToString(byte[] byteArr)
    {
        int i;
        char[] charArr = new char[byteArr.Length*2];
        for (i = 0; i < byteArr.Length; i++)
        {
            charArr[2 * i] = (char)((int)byteArr[i] / 36+48);
            int byt = byteArr[i] % 36; // 36=num of availible charachters
            if (byt < 10)
            {
                charArr[2*i+1] = (char)(byt + 48); //if % result is a digit
            }
            else
            {
                charArr[2*i+1] = (char)(byt + 87); //if % result is a letter
            }
        }
        return new String(charArr);
    }

and now you have a string double-lengthed when odd char is the multiply of 36 and even char is the residu. for example: 200=36*5+20 => "5k".

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1  
You would lose data, though. No way to convert it back to the original string. –  C.Evenhuis Sep 13 '11 at 8:43
    
@C.Evenhuis: edited. now you can convert it back. –  Seffix Sep 13 '11 at 9:00

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