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I'm new to iPhone and i know about the primitive data structure in C like array and all but in objective c there is dictionary,i know that it is having a key value pair structure we can access values from equivalent keys and mutable dictionary is dynamic and all.I mean the basic structure i am aware about, but when we have to prefer dictionary?,what are the possible manipulation we can do in dictionary,how optimized it is?. Any help appreciated in advance.

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An NSDictionary is a hash map. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hashmap – Thilo Sep 13 '11 at 8:09
    
NSDictionary is not a HashMap but key-value pair.NSSet is the Objective-C version of a HashMap – rckoenes Sep 13 '11 at 8:30
    
Isn't the NSSet the Obj-C version of HashSet? That would make more sense. – LordTwaroog Sep 13 '11 at 9:07
up vote 2 down vote accepted

An NSDictionary is known more generally as an Associative Array.

See the following Wikipedia article for a full explanation

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Associative_array

You would use a dictionary rather than an array where you need to refer to an object by (for example) a name, rather than its position (index) in a list.

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partial answer:

an NSDictionary is a CFDictionary. to see the implementation of an earlier version of CFDictionary, apple's hosted a library called CF-Lite. reading the source may answer some questions about the type and its implementation.

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Nsdictionary is like java dictionary. in this you add object for a particular key and fetch this data. if u r new in objective c please go to this link is good for u.

http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/Objective-C_2.0_Essentials

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