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can you someone provide full example of data binding select and LazyQueryContainer? Binding with another container is welcomed too. (LQC in contains method expected index in container not item - this is different behavoir).

I can't get working simple example:

First table: Currency (ID, Code, Name) .... {1, USD, Dolar;2,EUR,Euro} Second table ExchangeRate(ID, CcyFrom, CcyTo, Rate,ValidFrom) ... {1,1,2,1.515,2011/01/01;....}

I have one container which contains all records from Currency. I set it as source of Select ...

Select result = new Select("Select currency", currencies);        result.setItemCaptionMode(Select.ITEM_CAPTION_MODE_PROPERTY);        result.setItemCaptionPropertyId("code");

It works fine.

I have second container which contains some select of ExchangeRate. I bind it to form, replace TextField with select. Now I want to set correct value to select .... but select.setValue(newValue) doesn't work When I debug it I found out that newValue wasn;t found at container ... how can I do it right?

There are several examples at book of vaadin unfortunatelly they doesn't use LQC or doesn;'t use container for select source (popup and value).

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3 Answers 3

I'm using Criteria Container (a subclass of Lazy Query Container) however it appears this and ComboBox are incompatible, due to LQC providing the index and ComboBox expecting the item - see http://vaadin.com/forum/-/message_boards/view_message/254510

The workaround I've used is simply to load all the entities into a BeanItemContainer as shown below. I've only got do deal with a few thousand entries in this case and it's surprisingly performant.

  BeanItemContainer<Contact> bic = new BeanItemContainer<Contact>(Contact.class);
  List<Contact> contacts = dao.all(Contact.class, Contact_.lastName);
  bic.addAll(contacts);

  ComboBox cb = new ComboBox("Please select contact");
  cb.setContainerDataSource(bic);
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Adding a few thousand items to a ComboBox is NOT performant when you start scaling users. Remember all this is being stashed away in the HtppSession. Your memory consumption will go through the roof if you aren't very careful.

I recently did a simple test profiling an application that used the IndexedContainer vs. BeanItemContainer and the amount of memory consumed was VERY different. The BeanItem under test was a persistent JPA entity with many relationships and properties. For the combobox we really only need two properties: id and name.

The BeanItemContainer consumed 50MB per user vs 2MB per user for the IndexedContainer. So as you can see it will not scale very well if you aren't careful what type of information is stored in the session. IMHO even 2MB isn't satisfactory and a better design would use lazy query container instead.

The BeanItemContainer will essential create a copy of every field/association whether it has data in it or not which accounts for most of the difference in memory. The Eclipse Memory Analyzer plugin is very nice for analyzing heap dumps :)

class EditViewTest {

private ComboBox comboBox

@Test
void serialize() {
    BeanItemContainer<Organization> container = new BeanItemContainer<Organization>(Organization)
    container.addAll(getAllOrgs().sort({ a, b -> a.name <=> b.name }))

    comboBox = new ComboBox('Organization', container)
    comboBox.setItemCaptionMode(Select.ITEM_CAPTION_MODE_PROPERTY)
    comboBox.setItemCaptionPropertyId("name")

    long fileLength
    def temp = File.createTempFile('orgs','.ser')
    try {
        temp.withObjectOutputStream { out ->
            out << comboBox
        }
        fileLength = temp.length()
    }
    finally {
        temp.delete()
    }

    println fileLength / 1024 / 1024
    HeapDumper.dumpHeap('serialize.bin', true)

    Thread.sleep(10000L)
}

@Test
void serialize2() {
    comboBox = new ComboBox()
    getAllOrgs().each { Organization org ->
        comboBox.addItem(org.id)
        comboBox.setItemCaption(org.id, org.name)
    }

    long fileLength
    def temp = File.createTempFile('orgs','.ser')
    try {
        temp.withObjectOutputStream { out ->
            out << comboBox
        }
        fileLength = temp.length()
    }
    finally {
        temp.delete()
    }

    println fileLength / 1024 / 1024
    HeapDumper.dumpHeap('serialize2.bin', true)

    Thread.sleep(10000L)
}

private List getAllOrgs() {
    def orgs = []
    3197.times {
        orgs << new Organization(id: UUID.randomUUID().toString(), 
            company: new Company(name: RandomStringUtils.randomAscii(24)))
    }
    return orgs
}
}

You can use HotSpotDiagnosticMXBean to dump heap programmaticly with Oracle JVM or 'com.ibm.jvm.Dump.HeapDump()' for IBM JDK.

2MB heap consumed (serialized: 0.33 MB) vs 50MB (serialized: 13.12MB)

YMMV depending on which platform / JDK you run.

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even this thread is kinda old... i think another solution would be to use the core Vaadin containers with Pagination. this will ensure the maximum records are set up by the client. On other part i'm curious if i can use the LazyQueryCOntainer using the legacy dao implementation, and not by implementing the QUeryFactory Interface. Any feedback is helpful.

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