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Something wierd is happening in my javascript and i dont understand it. Can anyone explain?

var adsl2pSpeed = '9500 - 12500';

        alert(adsl2pSpeed);

        if (!adsl2pSpeed) {
            alert(adsl2pSpeed);
            var adsl2pSpeed = 'Unknown';
        }


        var speed = document.getElementById("PredictedSpeed");
        speed.innerHTML = adsl2pSpeed + " b/s";

This alerts "Undefined" twice and sets the innerhtml to be "Unknown". If I comment out the if statment it alerts '9500 - 12500' and sets the innerHTML to be '9500 - 12500'. Whats happening? Is the string is being cast as an object so it becomes null?

EDIT : I am actually registing the adsl2pSpeed as a startup script not in the function. I moved it up for clarity but possibly that is the problem?

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1  
Testcase please. Looking at the indentation the real code has stuff between the first two lines... –  ThiefMaster Sep 13 '11 at 8:57
    
Is that your exact code? Or is something in a function? –  Thilo Sep 13 '11 at 8:58
    
something else is going on. This fiddle works ok... jsfiddle.net/2jz9k What browser are you using? What is your markup? Do you have any funky libraries loaded etc...? –  El Ronnoco Sep 13 '11 at 8:59
    
Doesn't for me: jsfiddle.net/v6D9r. Show us the rest of the code. BTW, you don't need the var before var adsl2pSpeed = 'Unknown';... the variable adsl2pSpeed has already been declared. –  Matt Sep 13 '11 at 8:59
    
@Matt: I think that var is causing the problem because the indented code is in its own function (which Tom did not tell us about), and the var makes a new local variable. –  Thilo Sep 13 '11 at 9:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Speculation:

The indented code is in a function.

   if (!adsl2pSpeed) {
        alert(adsl2pSpeed);
        var adsl2pSpeed = 'Unknown';
    }

You are in that function declaring a local variable, which masks the global variable, so it looks "undefined".

Try to remove the var to avoid making a new variable.

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+1 Would seem like that's the most obvious cause. Would help if the OP mentioned that (if that is indeed the case...) –  El Ronnoco Sep 13 '11 at 9:04

I think Thilo is right. If the code is in a function like:

var adsl2pSpeed = '9500 - 12500';

function test() {
 alert(adsl2pSpeed);
 if (!adsl2pSpeed) {
   alert(adsl2pSpeed);
   var adsl2pSpeed = 'Unknown';
 }
 var speed = document.getElementById("PredictedSpeed");
 speed.innerHTML = adsl2pSpeed + " b/s";
}

// some code runs ...  

test();

then the declaration of adsl2pSpeed inside the if-statement is "hoisted" to the top of the function, so that the function actually is interpreted like this:

function test() {
 var adsl2pSpeed;  // declaration hoisted to the top, shadows the global var
 alert(adsl2pSpeed);
 if (!adsl2pSpeed) {
   alert(adsl2pSpeed);
   adsl2pSpeed = 'Unknown';   // assignment to local var
 }
 var speed = document.getElementById("PredictedSpeed");
 speed.innerHTML = adsl2pSpeed + " b/s";
}

This article explains it: http://bustingseams.blogspot.com/2009/08/another-javascript-pitfall-hoisting.html

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