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The following code is a manual version of an array sorting algorithm, taking any array of integers, and changing that array so that it is in non-decreasing order. For some reason, my scala console just sits there (seemingly computing things) when I call this procedure on an array, and I don't know why.

def main(a: Array[Int]) {
    var l = a.length
    var switchesLeft = true

    while( switchesLeft == true) {

      var z = 0
      var i = 0;

      while( i < l ) {
        var x = i + 1

        if( x == l ) x = 0

        if( a(i) > a(x) ) {
          // Switch the elements
          var t = a(x)
          a(x) = a(i)
          a(i) = t

          z += 1;
        }

        i += 1
      }

      if( z == 0) {
        // No switches were done
        switchesLeft = false
      }

    }
}
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Have you tried logging? I don't know Scala but in other languages i'd log what the values are each iteration. –  James Khoury Sep 13 '11 at 5:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The reason for cycling is if( x == l ) x = 0. Leave it out, and write while( i + 1 < l ) for the loop condition, then it works.

Here is a slightly improved version:

def sort(a: Array[Int]) {
  var l = a.length
  var switchesLeft = true

  while(switchesLeft) {

    switchesLeft = false
    for(i <- 0 until l-1 if a(i) > a(i+1)){
      // Switch the elements
      val t = a(i+1)
      a(i+1) = a(i)
      a(i) = t

      switchesLeft = true
    }
  }
}
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Thank your for your answer and improved solution. Why exactly does if( x == l ) x = 0 cause the cycle? i is still being increased everytime, so the way I look at it, it should break out of the loop. I.e. what exactly am I overlooking / misunderstanding? –  Sean Carruthers Sep 13 '11 at 19:06
1  
After you set x to 0, you compare the last element a(i) with the first element a(x) and put the bigger value to the first position. In the next loop steps this element bubbles up again, until you put it back in front. –  Landei Sep 13 '11 at 20:16
    
Ah, that makes sense. Thank you! –  Sean Carruthers Sep 13 '11 at 23:44

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