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I am making a game which demands great traffic of data like Positions(2D) and many other data. I am using a very simple class to help me listening on 8080 port(UDP), and a method to send datagram :

public static void SendToHostUDP(string Msg)
{
    UdpClient udpClient = new UdpClient();
    udpClient.Connect(Main.HostIP, 8080);
    byte[] sdBytes = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(Msg);
    udpClient.BeginSend(sdBytes, sdBytes.Length, CallBack, udpClient);
    Main.UDPout += sdBytes.Length / 1000f;
}
public static void SendToClientUDP(string Msg, IPAddress ip)
{
    UdpClient udpClient = new UdpClient();
    udpClient.Connect(ip, 8080);
    byte[] sdBytes = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(Msg);
    udpClient.BeginSend(sdBytes, sdBytes.Length, CallBack, udpClient);
    Main.UDPout += sdBytes.Length / 1000f;
}
public static void CallBack(IAsyncResult ar)
{

}

The listener class is just a very simple one:

public class NetReciever
{
    public TcpListener tcpListener;
    public Thread listenThread;
    private Action actionToPerformTCP;
    private Action actionToPerformUDP;
    public UdpClient udpClient;
    public Thread UDPThread;
    TimerAction UDPPacketsCounter;
    int UDPPacketsCounts;
    private BackgroundWorker bkgUDPListener;
    string msg;
    public NetReciever(IPAddress IP)
    {
        this.tcpListener = new TcpListener(IPAddress.Any, 25565);
        this.udpClient = new UdpClient(8080);
        this.UDPThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(UDPListen));
        this.listenThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(ListenForClients));
        this.listenThread.Start();
        UDPPacketsCounter = new TimerAction(CountUDPPackets, 1000, false);
        this.UDPThread.Start();
    }
    public void CountUDPPackets()
    {
        UDPPacketsCounts = 0;
    }
    public void Abort()
    {
        UDPThread.Abort();
        udpClient.Close();
        listenThread.Abort();
        tcpListener.Stop();
    }
    public void UDPListen()
    {
        while (true)
        {
            IPEndPoint RemoteIPEndPoint = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any, 0);
            byte[] receiveBytesUDP = udpClient.Receive(ref RemoteIPEndPoint);
            if (receiveBytesUDP != null)
            {
                UDPPacketsCounts++;
                Main.UDPin += receiveBytesUDP.Length / 1000f;
            }
            if (Main.isHost)
            {
                Main.Server.processUDP(Encoding.ASCII.GetString(receiveBytesUDP), RemoteIPEndPoint.Address.ToString());
            }
            else
            {
                if (RemoteIPEndPoint.Address.ToString() == Main.HostIP)
                {
                    Program.game.ProcessUDP(Encoding.ASCII.GetString(receiveBytesUDP));
                }
            }
        }
    }

So basically when there is 1 player, there will be approximately 60packet/s IN and 60 packets/s out.

It acts like this:

  1. Listen for packets.
  2. Validate the packets.
  3. Process the packets data -> Like storing some of the positions, sending back some packets...

So it just loop like this.

And the problems are here:

Firstly, When there are 2 players(Host+ 1Client), there will be some significant FPS drops at some point, and the host will experience stuttering of all audios(like in blue screen) for a moment.

Secondly, when there are 2+ players(Host + 1+Client), the Host FPS will drop to 5-20, and it will lag+lag+lag+lag but not freezing.

I have read some articles about async, and this is already threaded?

And also BeginRecieve and EndRecieve, I don't really understand how and why do I need to use it.

Could someonekindly provide some examples to explain how to process these kinds of data and send/recieve packets please? I don't really want to use libraries because I want to know what is going on.

P.S: How do the networking system in Terraria works? It uses TCP but it is smooth! How?
PSS: What is buffering? Why do i need to set buffering and how? What does it changes?
PSSS: I think there are something to be tuned and changed in sending the packets, because it just look so simple.

share|improve this question
1  
"The only way to win the game is to not play at all." You shouldn't be flooding the network with large amounts of data - only send data when the value has actually changed. Furthermore rate limiting and client prediction are used to avoid this very same problem. Honestly, 2 minutes on Google would have told you that - and given you examples. –  Jonathan Dickinson Sep 13 '11 at 9:25
    
Why is your callback empty? At the very least you should be calling udpClient.EndSend to complete the async operation. Isn't this basically the same question you asked yesterday? –  spender Sep 13 '11 at 9:30
    
What is ListenForClients? It's not in your code anywhere. –  spender Sep 13 '11 at 9:34
    
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2 Answers 2

The asyncronous concept is definitely something you want to look into here. What could be the issue is that with everything running on the same thread, certain UI actions (like graphic rendering (your fps loss), or playing sound (your stuttering)) may well be waiting for other aspects of the program, such as network communications.

Normally, you'd seperate the threads out, so that the UI and sound side of things can process on their own, without the dependence on anything else. Have a read of some of the msdn thread examples, then try putting your longer running processes on a seperate thread from your UI and see how that helps:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa645740(v=vs.71).aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot! The stuttering of the sound is global, when I was using iTunes or Skype, the stuttering also occurs when I starts the game until about 1 min after the game closes, is that only my computer issues? THanks! so basically I start a new thread on my Server class, that will be better right? and also use beginrecieve rather than recieve? –  Live0les Sep 13 '11 at 9:39
    
But again, is there some example that I could follow? Thanks a lot again! –  Live0les Sep 13 '11 at 9:51
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If you truly want to create a networked game there will be no way around learning more about network programming than you seem to know so far.

A good start is http://gafferongames.com/networking-for-game-programmers/sending-and-receiving-packets/. Whilst this is for C++ (I think, but if I remember right someone portet it to C# also, maybe :P) the theory behind all this is explained very well.

It might also be worth reading up on WinAPI socket programming. This will be more technical than reading tutorials on how to do network programming in C#, but it will also make things more clear than using wrappers that obfuscate whats really going on behind the scenes.

Edit:

Basically its up to you weather you use a backgroud thread for listening for packets or use BeginReceive with an AsyncCallback method. The drawback of the latter is that you will eventually need to call EndReceive at which point it will still block you application until the actual receive is finished. Creating your own thread and using blocking mode will obviously not block your UI/business logic (main) thread, but you will need to program the cross thread communication part yourself.

I also found a simple tutorial for an UDP-Client-Server app using threading and blocking mode here.

share|improve this answer
    
I have read the articles but i can't still find my problem, do I use a thread for listening UDP Packets(blocking mode) or just BeginRecieve? Thanks! –  Live0les Sep 14 '11 at 10:08
    
@Live: See the edit of my original post. –  Sascha Hennig Sep 14 '11 at 11:38
    
Thanks a lot! I will read the link =) –  Live0les Sep 14 '11 at 12:06
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