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How can I check in bash and csh if commands are builtin? Is there a method compatible with most shells?

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This should really be two questions. bash being compliant with POSIX sh, and csh being entirely uncompliant, the shells are entirely different; you might as well ask a question about how to do a thing in Python and Java. –  Charles Duffy May 11 at 15:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can try using which in csh or type in bash. If something is a built-in command, it will say so; otherwise, you get the location of the command in your PATH.

In csh:

# which echo
echo: shell built-in command.

# which parted
/sbin/parted

In bash:

# type echo
echo is a shell builtin

# type parted
parted is /sbin/parted

type might also show something like this:

# type clear
clear is hashed (/usr/bin/clear)

...which means that it's not a built-in, but that bash has stored its location in a hashtable to speed up access to it; (a little bit) more in this post on Unix & Linux.

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In bash, you can use the builtin builtin :-)

If you try to call an explicit builtin command and it isn't one, you get an error exit code. See the following example where cd is a builtin but ls is not:

pax> builtin cd >/dev/null 2>&1 ; echo $?
0
pax> builtin ls >/dev/null 2>&1 ; echo $?
1

From the bash man page:

builtinshell-builtin [arguments]

          Execute the specified shell builtin, passing it arguments, and return its exit status. This is useful when defining a function whose name is the same as a shell builtin, retaining the functionality of the builtin within the function. The cd builtin is commonly redefined this way. The return status is false if shell-builtin is not a shell builtin command.

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For bash, use type command

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For csh, you can use:

which command-name

If it's built-in, it will tell so. Not sure if it works the same for bash. We careful with aliases, though. There may be options for that.

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The other answers here are close, but they all fail if there is an alias or function with the same name as the command you're checking.

Here's my solution:

In tcsh

Use the where command, which gives all occurrences of the command name, including whether it's a built-in. Then grep to see if one of the lines says that it's a built-in.

alias isbuiltin 'test \!:1 != "builtin" && where \!:1 | egrep "built-?in" > /dev/null || echo \!:1" is not a built-in"'

In bash/zsh

Use type -a, which gives all occurrences of the command name, including whether it's a built-in. Then grep to see if one of the lines says that it's a built-in.

isbuiltin() {
  if [[ $# -ne 1 ]]; then
    echo "Usage: $0 command"
    return 1
  fi
  cmd=$1
  if ! type -a $cmd 2> /dev/null | egrep '\<built-?in\>' > /dev/null
  then
    printf "$cmd is not a built-in\n" >&2
    return 1
  fi
  return 0
}

In ksh88/ksh93

Open a sub-shell so that you can remove any aliases or command names of the same name. Then in the subshell, use whence -v. There's also some extra archaic syntax in this solution to support ksh88.

isbuiltin() {
  if [[ $# -ne 1 ]]; then
    echo "Usage: $0 command"
    return 1
  fi
  cmd=$1
  if (
       #Open a subshell so that aliases and functions can be safely removed,
       #  allowing `whence -v` to see the built-in command if there is one.
       unalias "$cmd";
       if [[ "$cmd" != '.' ]] && typeset -f | egrep "^(function *$cmd|$cmd\(\))" > /dev/null 2>&1
       then
         #Remove the function iff it exists.
         #Since `unset` is a special built-in, the subshell dies if it fails
         unset -f "$cmd";
       fi
       PATH='/no';
       #NOTE: we can't use `whence -a` because it's not supported in older versions of ksh
       whence -v "$cmd" 2>&1
     ) 2> /dev/null | grep -v 'not found' | grep 'builtin' > /dev/null 2>&1
  then
    #No-op
    :
  else
    printf "$cmd is not a built-in\n" >&2
    return 1
  fi
}

Using the Solution

Once you applied the aforementioned solution in the shell of your choice, you can use it like this...

At the command line:

$ isbuiltin command

If the command is a built-in, it prints nothing; otherwise, it prints a message to stderr.

Or you can use it like this in a script:

if isbuiltin $cmd 2> /dev/null
then
  echo "$cmd is a built-in"
else
  echo "$cmd is NOT a built-in"
fi
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