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I have a couple of smaller asset files (text templates typically 100 - a few K bytes) in my app that I'm considering caching using memcached. But does anyone here know if loading a local file or requesting it from memcache is the fastest/most resource efficient?

(I'll be using the Python version of App Engine)

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If they're templates, the templating system you're using probably already supports caching the compiled templates in memory. What library are you using? –  Nick Johnson Sep 14 '11 at 0:38
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Actually, I won't be using (server-side) templates, but static pages generated in a build script. –  Jacob Oscarson Sep 14 '11 at 7:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If they are just few kbytes I would load them on the instance memory; amongst the storage choices (Memcache, Datastore, Blobstore and so on) on Google App Engine , instance memory option shoud be the fastest.

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Um, if it takes 20-25 milliseconds to read something from instance memory (eg, a global variable), something is seriously wrong. –  Nick Johnson Sep 14 '11 at 0:37
    
my bad, we are easily an order of magnitude below.(I'm getting old) –  systempuntoout Sep 14 '11 at 2:02

Local file should be faster, but it's not scaleable. If you will need to access file from several instances it will not work

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I do need to access them from all instances, but there included in every instance and stays the same btw deployments, so why wouldn't it scale? It's almost the same as serving static files isn't it? –  Jacob Oscarson Sep 13 '11 at 10:14
    
If this files will be unchangable than use local files. If you need caching with expiration and want to cache pre-rendered templates with variables substituion than memcached can be better. –  varela Sep 13 '11 at 10:18
    
The filesystem is read-only; of course the files are unchangeable... –  Wooble Sep 13 '11 at 11:38

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