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For the following sample of code there is memory leak. How can we prevent memory leak in the following case:

            1 #include <stdio.h>
            2 #include <stdlib.h>
            3 
            4 typedef struct sample_help {
            5 int *value;
            6 void **pointers;
            7 }*sample,sample_node;
            8 
            9 
            10 sample main(){
            11 sample  ABC=NULL; 
            12 sample  XYZ=NULL;
            13 sample  kanchi = NULL;
            14 
            15 ABC = malloc(sizeof(sample_node));
            16 XYZ = malloc(sizeof(sample_node));
            17 ABC->pointers = malloc(5*sizeof(void *));
            18 XYZ->pointers = malloc(5*sizeof(void *));
            19 ABC->value = malloc(5*sizeof(int));
            20 XYZ->value = malloc(5*sizeof(int));
            21 
            22 ABC->value[0] = 10;
            23 ABC->value[1] = 20;
            24 
            25 XYZ->pointers[0] = ABC;
            26 kanchi = XYZ->pointers[0];
            27 
            28 printf("::::%d\n",XYZ->pointers[0]);
            29 printf("kanchi1:::::%d\n",kanchi->value[0]);
            30 
            31 
            32 return XYZ;
            33 }
            34 

Following is the output of valgrind.

==27448== 
==27448== HEAP SUMMARY:
==27448==     in use at exit: 152 bytes in 6 blocks 
==27448==   total heap usage: 6 allocs, 0 frees, 152 bytes allocated
==27448== 
==27448== 152 (16 direct, 136 indirect) bytes in 1 blocks are definitely lost in loss  record 6 of 6
==27448==    at 0x4C244E8: malloc (vg_replace_malloc.c:236)
==27448==    by 0x40056B: main (test2.c:16)
==27448== 
==27448== LEAK SUMMARY:
==27448==    definitely lost: 16 bytes in 1 blocks
==27448==    indirectly lost: 136 bytes in 5 blocks
==27448==      possibly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==27448==    still reachable: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==27448==         suppressed: 0 bytes in 0 blocks  
==27448== 
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3  
sample main()?... –  quasiverse Sep 13 '11 at 10:23
1  
@thetna Are you sure that's legal? –  quasiverse Sep 13 '11 at 10:24
2  
@thetna ... your logic is really badly broken. –  quasiverse Sep 13 '11 at 10:29
2  
@thetna: OK - in that case you should implement this is a proper function and then call it from main if you want to test it. –  Paul R Sep 13 '11 at 10:34
2  
@thetna: see my answer below for how to (a) implement this properly (without abusing main()) and (b) how to free the memory in the caller when you're done. –  Paul R Sep 13 '11 at 10:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your code should really be more like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct sample_help {
    int *value;
    void **pointers;
} *sample, sample_node;

sample foo(void)
{
    sample  ABC=NULL;
    sample  XYZ=NULL;
    sample  kanchi = NULL;

    ABC = malloc(sizeof(sample_node));
    XYZ = malloc(sizeof(sample_node));
    ABC->pointers = malloc(5*sizeof(void *));
    XYZ->pointers = malloc(5*sizeof(void *));
    ABC->value = malloc(5*sizeof(int));
    XYZ->value = malloc(5*sizeof(int));

    ABC->value[0] = 10;
    ABC->value[1] = 20;

    XYZ->pointers[0] = ABC;
    kanchi = XYZ->pointers[0];

    printf("::::%d\n",XYZ->pointers[0]);
    printf("kanchi1:::::%d\n",kanchi->value[0]);

    return XYZ;
}

int main(void)
{
    // call your function
    sample xyz = foo();

    // ... do something with the data structure xyz ...

    // free memory allocated by your function
    free(xyz->pointers[0]->value);    // free ABC->value
    free(xyz->pointers[0]->pointers); // free ABC->pointers
    free(xyz->pointers[0]);           // free ABC
    free(xyz->value);                 // free XYZ->value
    free(xyz->pointers);              // free XYZ->pointers
    free(xyz);                        // free XYZ

    return 0;
}

Note that we free the data structure from within main() after we're done with it.

share|improve this answer

Just free the used memory when it's no longer needed:

free(ABC->value);
free(XYZ->value);
free(ABC->pointers);
free(XYZ->pointers);
free(ABC);
free(XYZ);

Btw: When this is the whole program, it wouldn't actually matter. Since the OS reclaims all unfreed memory when a process is ended, memory that is in use until the termination of the programm is not required to be freed. However, it is good practice.

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1  
With sample main() we know there is no OS :P –  pmg Sep 13 '11 at 10:32
    
If i free XYZ then how can I return the strucutre?I want to return the XYZ with the ABC assigned in the pointers of XYZ.Lets take an analogy that , a node is added in the root node. –  thetna Sep 13 '11 at 10:33
    
The caller of main() in this case needs to free the memory after using the values. It is very odd to use main() in this way, can you describe more about the wider context of what you are doing? –  Vicky Sep 13 '11 at 10:34
    
You never know when someone else will take your code (even you, 6 months later) and move it around without reviewing it. Consider for example renaming this main() function so it can be used in a deeper program. Because of that potential (even though small), I don't consider proper memory management to merely be "good practice", I consider it to be a solid requirement. –  mah Sep 13 '11 at 10:35
    
Don't free XYZ, return a pointer to it and the function which receives it then is responsible for freeing it later. –  jmsu Sep 13 '11 at 10:36

Having now read your update in the comments, your module (not called main()) that allocates and returns the memory is fine.

Whatever module uses the value returned from your module, needs to free the data after use. So if you implement your module as

sample mymodule(void)
{
    sample foo = malloc(10);
    /* set up contents of foo as required */
    return foo;
}

Then the caller of mymodule would go like this:

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
    sample bar = mymodule();
    /* use contents of bar as required */
    free(bar);
    return 0;
}
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