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The question is a bit theoretical, what is the cost of creating JAXB context, marshaller and unmarshaller?

I've found that my code could benefit from keeping the same JAXB context and possibly the same marshaller for all marshaling operations rather than creating context and marshaller on each marshaling.

So what is the cost of creating JAXB context and marshaller/unmarshaller? Is it okay to create context+marshaller for each marshaling operation or it's better to avoid it?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 40 down vote accepted

Note: I'm the EclipseLink JAXB (MOXy) lead and a member of the JAXB 2 (JSR-222) expert group.

JAXBContext is thread safe and should only be created once and reused to avoid the cost of initializing the metadata multiple times. Marshaller and Unmarshaller are not thread safe, but are lightweight to create and could be created per operation.

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3  
great answer. I can be confident now based on your experience as lead on JAXB. –  Vladimir Sep 13 '11 at 12:22
2  
I trust you, but is this to be found somewhere in documentation? –  Hurda Jan 30 at 22:02
    
It's documented for the RI: jaxb.java.net/guide/Performance_and_thread_safety.html (but not Moxy AFAIK) –  Caoilte Aug 24 at 16:33

Ideally you should have a singleton JAXBContext and local instances of Marshaller and Unmarshaller. JAXBContext instances are thread-safe while Marshaller and Unmarshaller instances are not thread-safe and should never be shared across threads.

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thanks for the answer. Unfortunately I have to select only one answer :-) –  Vladimir Sep 13 '11 at 12:23

It's a pity that this isn't specifically described in the javadoc. What I can tell is that Spring uses a global JAXBContext, shared between threads, whereas it creates a new marshaller for each marshalling operation, with a javadoc comment in the code saying that JAXB marshallers are not necessarily thread-safe.

The same is said on this page: http://jaxb.java.net/guide/Performance_and_thread_safety.html.

I would guess that creating a JAXBContext is a costly operation, because it involves scanning classes and packages for annotations. But measuring it is the best way to know.

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Hi @JB, great answer especially your comments on measuring and why JAXBContext is costly. –  Vladimir Sep 13 '11 at 12:20

I solved this problem using shared thread safe JAXBContext and thread local un/marschallers (so theoretically, there will be as many un/marshaller instances as there are threads which accessed them) with synchronization only on un/marshaller's initialization.

private final ThreadLocal<Unmarshaller> unmarshallerThreadLocal = new ThreadLocal<Unmarshaller>() {
    protected synchronized Unmarshaller initialValue() {
        try {
            return jaxbContext.createUnmarshaller();
        } catch (JAXBException e) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("Unable to create unmarshaller");
        }
    }
};
private final ThreadLocal<Marshaller> marshallerThreadLocal = new ThreadLocal<Marshaller>() {
    protected synchronized Marshaller initialValue() {
        try {
            return jaxbContext.createMarshaller();
        } catch (JAXBException e) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("Unable to create marshaller");
        }
    }
};

private final JAXBContext jaxbContext;

private MyClassConstructor(){
    try {
        jaxbContext = JAXBContext.newInstance(Entity.class);
    } catch (JAXBException e) {
        throw new IllegalStateException("Unable to initialize");
    }
}
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ThreadLocal will introduce other subtile problems, without benefit. Just keep a single JAXBContext (that's the costly part) and create a new Unmarshaller whenever required. –  ymajoros Feb 3 at 9:12

I usually solve problems like this with a ThreadLocal class pattern. Given the fact that you need a different marshaller for each Class, you can combine it with a singleton-map pattern.

To save you 15 minutes, of work. Here follows my implementation of a thread-safe Factory for Jaxb Marshallers and Unmarshallers.

It allows you to access the instances as follows ...

Marshaller m = Jaxb.get(SomeClass.class).getMarshaller();
Unmarshaller um = Jaxb.get(SomeClass.class).getUnmarshaller();

And the code you will need is a little Jaxb class that looks as follows:

public class Jaxb
{
  // singleton pattern: one instance per class.
  private static Map<Class,Jaxb> singletonMap = new HashMap<>();
  private Class clazz;

  // thread-local pattern: one marshaller/unmarshaller instance per thread
  private ThreadLocal<Marshaller> marshallerThreadLocal = new ThreadLocal<>();
  private ThreadLocal<Unmarshaller> unmarshallerThreadLocal = new ThreadLocal<>();

  // The static singleton getter needs to be thread-safe too, 
  // so this method is marked as synchronized.
  public static synchronized Jaxb get(Class clazz)
  {
    Jaxb jaxb =  singletonMap.get(clazz);
    if (jaxb == null)
    {
      jaxb = new Jaxb(clazz);
      singletonMap.put(clazz, jaxb);
    }
    return jaxb;
  }

  // the constructor needs to be private, 
  // because all instances need to be created with the get method.
  private Jaxb(Class clazz)
  {
     this.clazz = clazz;
  }

  /**
   * Gets/Creates a marshaller (thread-safe)
   * @throws JAXBException
   */
  public Marshaller getMarshaller() throws JAXBException
  {
    Marshaller m = marshallerThreadLocal.get();
    if (m == null)
    {
      JAXBContext jc = JAXBContext.newInstance(clazz);
      m = jc.createMarshaller();
      marshallerThreadLocal.set(m);
    }
    return m;
  }

  /**
   * Gets/Creates an unmarshaller (thread-safe)
   * @throws JAXBException
   */
  public Unmarshaller getUnmarshaller() throws JAXBException
  {
    Unmarshaller um = unmarshallerThreadLocal.get();
    if (um == null)
    {
      JAXBContext jc = JAXBContext.newInstance(clazz);
      um = jc.createUnmarshaller();
      unmarshallerThreadLocal.set(um);
    }
    return um;
  }
}
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2  
ThreadLocal will introduce other subtile problems, without benefit. Just keep a single JAXBContext (that's the costly part) and create a new Unmarshaller whenever required. –  ymajoros Feb 3 at 9:12

Even better!! Based on the good solution from the post above, create the context just-once in the constructor, and save it instead of the class.

Replace the line:

  private Class clazz;

with this one:

  private JAXBContext jc;

And the main constructor with this one:

  private Jaxb(Class clazz)
  {
     this.jc = JAXBContext.newInstance(clazz);
  }

so in the getMarshaller/getUnmarshaller you can remove this line:

  JAXBContext jc = JAXBContext.newInstance(clazz);

This improvement makes, in my case, that processing times drops from 60~70ms to just 5~10ms

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