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I'am wondering whether it is possible to access type definitions of types which are given as previous template parameters in later template parameters in a template parameter list like so:

#include <iostream>

template<typename V>
struct TypeHolder {
    typedef V value_type;
};

template<typename T, T::value_type v>
struct ValueHolder {
    const static typename T::value_type value = v;
};

int main() {
    typedef TypeHolder<int> IntTypeHolder;
    typedef ValueHolder<IntTypeHolder,5> Five;

    std::cout << Five::value << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

When I compile the above example I get the following error:

damian@damian-HP-EliteBook-8440p:~$ g++ -o cpptest test.cpp
test.cpp:8:25: error: 'T::value_type' is not a type

Is this due to wrong syntax or is what I'm trying to do just not possible in c++?

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2  
Your first problem is the missing semicolons at the end of the struct definitions. I fixed that and updated with the more relevant error. Please let me know if I did wrong. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 13 '11 at 11:03

4 Answers 4

It's possible. You are missing the keyword typename.

 template<typename T, typename T::value_type v>
 struct ValueHolder { ^^^^^^^^
   ...

You have to inform the compiler that T::value_type is a type. Demo.

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2  
Nevermind. I got very confused. C++ grammar is so freaking ambiguous. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 13 '11 at 11:09

If you prefix typename to the template parameter it compiles:

template<typename T, typename T::value_type v>
struct ValueHolder {
    const static typename T::value_type value = v;
}

The use of typename helps the compiler know that in this case the identifier value_type referenced within the T:: namespace is a type and not a member function or variable.

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Try the following:

template<typename T, typename T::value_type v>
struct ValueHolder {
    const static typename T::value_type value = v;
};

You for got to prefix "typename" to your T:value_type ... unfortunately just because value_type is a typedef member of T does not mean that the C++ parser can tell. It may be an actual static data member, static method, etc. Therefore when accessing fully-qualified types in other namespaces/classes, you have to prefix them with typename.

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Please provide an educational moment for me ... why the downvote? –  Jason Sep 13 '11 at 11:10
    
Oh, okay, thanks :-) ... I'll edit the answer down to just the pertinent code segment so it's clearer. –  Jason Sep 13 '11 at 11:12
    
I see you added an explanation and +1ed now :) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 13 '11 at 11:15

It is due to wrong syntax, what you try to do with T::value_type v is to get a value right?

Then better use something like that :

template<typename T>
struct ValueHolder {
    const static typename T::value_type value;
    ValueHolder(typename T::value_type v)
    {
        ValueHolder::value = v;
    }
}
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No typename in the constructor parameter? –  Nawaz Sep 13 '11 at 11:30
    
Wasn't sure, but you're right –  Geoffroy Sep 13 '11 at 11:55
    
You didn't change the code? Are you not convinced that you should use typename in the parameter as well? –  Nawaz Sep 13 '11 at 11:59
    
Sorry, I was at worked and just forget to do it at the moment –  Geoffroy Sep 13 '11 at 12:47

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