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I am having trouble finding out how to form a triangle (not sawtooth) wave from a sine wave.

I understand how to create it for a Square wave:

if( sineValue >= 0 )
        value = amp;
    else
        value = -amp;

But I am not sure how to change this to accommodate for a triangle wave.

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1  
We might need more information about how you're generating this wave. How is it represented? How do you build it? And, ultimately, this is more of a maths question than a C++ one. Here's its mathematical description. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 13 '11 at 11:07
1  
Seems that he wants to be able to convert sine wave Y values to triangle wave Y values. More of a math question than programming though. –  tenfour Sep 13 '11 at 11:09
    
Interesting, though! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 13 '11 at 11:15
    
I didn't think about the fact that it was more of a mathematical question. The reason I asked here was because I am manipulating the buffers of a sound wave so that it produces a triangle wave. Thanks for your help though! –  Moonlight293 Sep 13 '11 at 11:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A triangle wave is the integral of a square wave. So you need to integrate (sum) your square wave over time:

if (sineValue >= 0)
{
    value += delta;
}
else
{
    value -= delta;
}

Note that this can be written more succinctly as:

value += (sineValue >= 0) ? delta : -delta;
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Does this need normalising? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 13 '11 at 11:10
    
@Tomalak: Yes. But that's a different issue (it depends on the frequency of the sine wave. And if you know the frequency of the sine wave, then you could generate the triangle wave a priori!) –  Oliver Charlesworth Sep 13 '11 at 11:10
    
This will introduce severe DC offset though... –  tdammers Sep 13 '11 at 11:11
3  
Why even bother with the sine wave data in this case? It's easier to just construct the triangle wave from scratch. But this only emphasizes @Tomalak Geret'kal's questions to the OP... –  tenfour Sep 13 '11 at 11:12
    
@tdammers: Not much that can be done about that with the information given... –  Oliver Charlesworth Sep 13 '11 at 11:12

You can use the sign of the derivative of your sine wave to generate a triangular wave like this:

if (sineValue - oldSineValue >= 0)
{
    value += delta;
}
else
{
    value -= delta;
}
oldSineValue = sineValue;

You will need to choose delta to give the required amplitude for your triangular wave, and this will of course be dependent on the frequency of the sine wave and the sampling rate.

The advantage of this method is that the triangular wave and sine wave have the same phase, i.e. peaks and zero crossings coincide.

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Why the derivative of the sine wave? –  Oliver Charlesworth Sep 13 '11 at 11:33
    
@Oli: not easy to explain without a diagram, but if you want zero crossings and peaks to coincide then using the derivative is one way to achieve this. Everywhere that the sine wave derivative is positive you want the triangular wave derivative to be positive and constant, and vice versa for the negative case. –  Paul R Sep 13 '11 at 11:39
    
Oh, I understand that it will enforce a 90-degree phase shift vs. using sineValue directly. Indeed. –  Oliver Charlesworth Sep 13 '11 at 11:39
    
Another way of looking at is is that taking the derivative of (or indeed integrating) a sinusoid gives you a 90 degree phase shift. –  Paul R Sep 13 '11 at 11:41

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