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I am a bit rusty on my cursor lingo in PL/SQL. Anyone know this?

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Anything different in terms of functionality? –  Brian G Sep 16 '08 at 16:24
2  
exact duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/74010/… –  msw May 13 '10 at 5:14
1  
the "duplicate" you are referring to doesn't explain the first part of the question: "what is a cursor". –  ax. May 13 '10 at 5:18

13 Answers 13

up vote 18 down vote accepted

An implicit cursor is one created "automatically" for you by Oracle when you execute a query. It is simpler to code, but suffers from

  • inefficiency (the ANSI standard specifies that it must fetch twice to check if there is more than one record)
  • vulnerability to data errors (if you ever get two rows, it raises a TOO_MANY_ROWS exception)

Example

SELECT col INTO var FROM table WHERE something;

An explicit cursor is one you create yourself. It takes more code, but gives more control - for example, you can just open-fetch-close if you only want the first record and don't care if there are others.

Example

DECLARE   
  CURSOR cur IS SELECT col FROM table WHERE something; 
BEGIN
  OPEN cur;
  FETCH cur INTO var;
  CLOSE cur;
END;
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This answer is great, lots of detail and snippets. Thanks –  Brian G Sep 17 '08 at 11:22
3  
This answer is good, and I would vote it up except that it says implicit cursors are inefficient, which is false - they are typically more efficient that explicit cursors in fact, in cases where they are appropriate! –  Tony Andrews May 13 '10 at 9:41
3  
-1 because the inefficiency reason is false since some 7.x version and the vulnerability to data errors is a good thing in my opinion. If you expect one row, but you get two, it is very desirable that you are warned by the TOO_MANY_ROWS exception. –  Rob van Wijk Jun 29 '10 at 8:27
    
Great answer :) –  Waqar Ahmad Jun 12 '12 at 7:14

An explicit cursor is defined as such in a declaration block:

DECLARE 
CURSOR cur IS 
  SELECT columns FROM table WHERE condition;
BEGIN
...

an implicit cursor is implented directly in a code block:

...
BEGIN
   SELECT columns INTO variables FROM table where condition;
END;
...
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An explicit cursor is one you declare, like:

CURSOR my_cursor IS
  SELECT table_name FROM USER_TABLES

An implicit cursor is one created to support any in-line SQL you write (either static or dynamic).

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In answer to the first question. Straight from the Oracle documentation

A cursor is a pointer to a private SQL area that stores information about processing a specific SELECT or DML statement.

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With explicit cursors, you have complete control over how to access information in the database. You decide when to OPEN the cursor, when to FETCH records from the cursor (and therefore from the table or tables in the SELECT statement of the cursor) how many records to fetch, and when to CLOSE the cursor. Information about the current state of your cursor is available through examination of the cursor attributes.

See http://www.unix.com.ua/orelly/oracle/prog2/ch06_03.htm for details.

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Google is your friend: http://docstore.mik.ua/orelly/oracle/prog2/ch06_03.htm

PL/SQL issues an implicit cursor whenever you execute a SQL statement directly in your code, as long as that code does not employ an explicit cursor. It is called an "implicit" cursor because you, the developer, do not explicitly declare a cursor for the SQL statement.

An explicit cursor is a SELECT statement that is explicitly defined in the declaration section of your code and, in the process, assigned a name. There is no such thing as an explicit cursor for UPDATE, DELETE, and INSERT statements.

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better still ;) google.com/… –  msw May 13 '10 at 5:18

Implicit cursors require anonymous buffer memory.

Explicit cursors can be executed again and again by using their name.They are stored in user defined memory space rather than being stored in an anonymous buffer memory and hence can be easily accessed afterwards.

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A cursor is a SELECTed window on an Oracle table, this means a group of records present in an Oracle table, and satisfying certain conditions. A cursor can SELECT all the content of a table, too. With a cursor you can manipulate Oracle columns, aliasing them in the result. An example of implicit cursor is the following:

BEGIN
   DECLARE
      CURSOR C1
      IS
         SELECT DROPPED_CALLS FROM ALARM_UMTS;

      C1_REC   C1%ROWTYPE;
   BEGIN
      FOR C1_REC IN C1
      LOOP
         DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE ('DROPPED CALLS: ' || C1_REC.DROPPED_CALLS);
      END LOOP;
   END;
END;
/

With FOR ... LOOP... END LOOP you open and close the cursor authomatically, when the records of the cursor have been all analyzed.

An example of explicit cursor is the following:

BEGIN
   DECLARE
      CURSOR C1
      IS
         SELECT DROPPED_CALLS FROM ALARM_UMTS;

      C1_REC   C1%ROWTYPE;
   BEGIN
      OPEN c1;

      LOOP
         FETCH c1 INTO c1_rec;

         EXIT WHEN c1%NOTFOUND;

         DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE ('DROPPED CALLS: ' || C1_REC.DROPPED_CALLS);
      END LOOP;

      CLOSE c1;
   END;
END;
/

In the explicit cursor you open and close the cursor in an explicit way, checking the presence of records and stating an exit condition.

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1.CURSOR: When PLSQL issues sql statements it creates private work area to parse & execute the sql statement is called cursor.

2.IMPLICIT: When any PL/SQLexecutable block issues sql statement. PL/SQL creates implicit cursor and manages automatically means implcit open & close takes place. It used when sql statement return only one row.It has 4 attributes SQL%ROWCOUNT, SQL%FOUND, SQL%NOTFOUND, SQL%ISOPEN.

3.EXPLICIT: It is created & managed by the programmer. It needs every time explicit open,fetch & close. It is used when sql statement returns more than one row. It has also 4 attributes CUR_NAME%ROWCOUNT, CUR_NAME%FOUND, CUR_NAME%NOTFOUND, CUR_NAME%ISOPEN. It process several rows by using loop. The programmer can pass the parameter too to explicit cursor.

  • Example: Explicit Cursor

 

declare 
   cursor emp_cursor 
   is 
   select id,name,salary,dept_id 
   from employees; 
   v_id employees.id%type; 
   v_name employees.name%type; 
   v_salary employees.salary%type; 
   v_dept_id employees.dept_id%type; 
   begin 
   open emp_cursor; 
   loop 
   fetch emp_cursor into v_id,v_name,v_salary,v_dept_id; 
   exit when emp_cursor%notfound;
   dbms_output.put_line(v_id||', '||v_name||', '||v_salary||','||v_dept_id); 
   end loop;                    
   close emp_cursor; 
   end;
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Every SQL statement executed by the Oracle database has a cursor associated with it, which is a private work area to store processing information. Implicit cursors are implicitly created by the Oracle server for all DML and SELECT statements.

You can declare and use Explicit cursors to name the private work area, and access its stored information in your program block.

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Implicit cursor returns only one record and are called automatically. However, explicit cursors are called manually and can return more than one record.

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Explicit...

cursor foo is select * from blah; begin open fetch exit when close cursor yada yada yada

don't use them, use implicit

cursor foo is select * from blah;

for n in foo loop x = n.some_column end loop

I think you can even do this

for n in (select * from blah) loop...

Stick to implicit, they close themselves, they are more readable, they make life easy.

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protected by Justin Cave Jul 17 '12 at 4:24

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