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Look at this script:

var human = 
{
   firstName: 'Saeed',
   lastName: 'Neamati',
   get fullName() {
       return this.firstName + ' ' + this.lastName;
   }
}

I don't know what get means in this context.

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possible duplicate of Does Javascript have get/set keywords like C#? –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Sep 13 '11 at 11:28

2 Answers 2

It´s a property. You can use it like this:

console.log(human.fullName); //Saeed Neamati

It´s a function that is called when accessing this property, and returns the value.

There are also setters available:

var human = 
{
   firstName: 'Saeed',
   lastName: 'Neamati',
   get fullName() {
       return this.firstName + ' ' + this.lastName;
   }
   set fullName(val) {
       var parts = val.split(' ');
       this.firstName = parts[0];
       this.lastName = parts[1];
   }
}

human.fullName = "Henry Miller";

But as cool as it might be, it´s not supported by all browsers. So it might be better avoid using it.

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It identifies an object property that's returned when the property is read.

See https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/Special/get

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This only works in ES5. It's saver to use Object.defineProperty with a proper shim –  Raynos Sep 13 '11 at 11:33
    
It seems to be reasonably well supported in non-ie browsers; robertnyman.com/javascript/… –  Alex K. Sep 13 '11 at 11:35
    
It works on Chrome, Safari, Firefox, and Opera. Not IE. OMG, Microsoft failed to adhere to a standard, making life worse for thousands of developers and millions of users! We better alert the media. This is going to be huge news! Microsoft's impeccable reputation will be in tatters! –  Malvolio Sep 13 '11 at 11:39
    
@Malvolio It does work in all browser apart from IE<9. But the point is that this syntax can not degrade gracefully, ever. Almost all other ES5 features can degrade gracefully. –  Raynos Sep 13 '11 at 11:41
2  
@Raynos -- which is why I encourage people to take advantage of the IE memory-cycle bug, so that users have more obvious reasons to upgrade their IE to a real browser. While any significant number of people still use IE, the course of human progress will be measurably slowed. –  Malvolio Sep 13 '11 at 11:55

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