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I wrote a class which instances may be accessed by several threads. I used a trick to remember users they have to lock the object before using it. It involves keeping only const instances. When in the need to read or modify sensitive data, other classes should call a method (which is const, thus allowed) to get a non-const version of the locked object. Actually it returns a proxy object containing a pointer to the non-const object and a scoped_lock, so it unlocks the object when going out of scope. The proxy object also overloads operator-> so the access to the object is transparent.

This way, shooting onself's foot by accessing unlocked objects is harder (there is always const_cast).

"Clever tricks" should be avoided, and this smells bad anyway.

Is this design really bad ? What else can I or should I do ?

Edit: Getters are non-const to enforce locking.

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Lesson one for programming: if you lie to the compiler, you will be punished. Are you lying to the compiler? –  Chris Sep 13 '11 at 13:09
    
Personally, I think forcing others not to make mistakes is too much. C++ doesn't prevent you from going over array boundaries, does it? YOU are the programmer and you should be the one careful. If you don't want your class to be accessed if not locked, tell the programmer to remember that. If he doesn't, that's his fault, not yours. –  Shahbaz Sep 13 '11 at 13:11
    
@Shahbaz: I disagree, protecting against Murphy is a worthwile goal. Otherwise we would not use a statically typed language and just hope for the best. –  Matthieu M. Sep 13 '11 at 13:13
    
The problem with your method are many. Aside from code generation problem, there is a logical problem. What if I copy that proxy object to a higher scope (let's say) global variable? and keep the lock locked forever? –  Shahbaz Sep 13 '11 at 13:15
    
@Metthieu, there is an undefined line between protection and freedom. You don't want your every line of code to be checked with an additional 10 lines of code would you? The error-checking that is done in C++ are ALL static. Which is fine. What Gabriel is doing is dynamic. –  Shahbaz Sep 13 '11 at 13:17
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is clever, but unfortunately doomed to fail.

The problem, underlined by spraff, is that you protect against reads but not against writes.

Consider the following sequence:

unsigned getAverageSalary(Employee const& e) {
  return e.paid() / e.hired_duration();
}

What happens if we increment paid between the two function calls ? We get an incoherent value.

The problem is that your scheme does not explicitly enforce locking for reads.

Consider the alternative of a Proxy pattern: The object itself is a bundle of data, all privates. Only a Proxy class (friend) can read/write its data, and when initializing the Proxy it grabs the lock (on the mutex of the object) automatically.

class Data {
  friend class Proxy;
  Mutex _mutex;
  int _bar;
};

class Proxy {
public:
  Proxy(Data& data): _lock(data._mutex), _data(data) {}

  int bar() const { return _data._bar; }
  void bar(int b) { _data._bar = b; }

private:
  Proxy(Proxy const&) = delete; // disable copy

  Lock _lock;
  Data& _data;
};
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The getters are actually non-const to enforce locking, that's where it gets ugly. –  Gabriel Sep 13 '11 at 13:25
    
I like the idea of a friend class, but I'd keep the business logic as private functions in Data, and add inline "forwarding" functions in Proxy for those private functions that should be accessible. –  Gabriel Sep 13 '11 at 13:29
    
@Gabriel: Unfortunately, while the scheme I propose is interesting (in this regard), it does not completely address the full const-ness issue. Here my getters are const, but since they operate on Data&, the compiler does not check whether they are actually const or not. It is better, still, from a user point of view. For your scheme, you might wish to use volatile instead of const, though the syntax differ slightly. –  Matthieu M. Sep 13 '11 at 13:30
    
@Gabriel: both forwarding and separating are fine as far as I am concerned, it's really a matter of personal preference as friend breaks encapsulation :) –  Matthieu M. Sep 13 '11 at 13:33
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Basic problem: a non-const reference may exist elsewhere. If that gets written safely, it does not follow that it can be read safely -- you may look at an intermediate state.

Also, some const methods might (legitimately) modify hidden internal details in a thread-unsafe way.

Analyse what you're actually doing to the object and find an appropriate synchronisation mode.

If your clever container really does know enough about the objects to control all their synchronisation via proxies, then make those objects private inner classes.

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+1 for the readers/writer lock suggestion, that'll be useful later. –  Gabriel Sep 13 '11 at 13:30
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If I wanted to do what you are doing, I would do one of the following.

Method 1:

shared_mutex m;  // somewhere outside the class

class A
{
private:
    int variable;
public:
    void lock() { m.lock(); }
    void unlock() { m.unlock(); }
    bool is_locked() { return m.is_locked(); }
    bool write_to_var(int newvalue)
    {
        if (!is_locked())
            return false;
        variable = newvalue;
        return true;
    }
    bool read_from_var(int *value)
    {
        if (!is_locked() || value == NULL)
            return false;
        *value = variable;
        return true;
    }
};

Method 2:

shared_mutex m;  // somewhere outside the class

class A
{
private:
    int variable;
public:
    void write_to_var(int newvalue)
    {
        m.lock();
        variable = newvalue;
        m.unlock();
    }
    int read_from_var()
    {
        m.lock();
        int to_return = variable;
        m.unlock();
        return to_return;
    }
};

The first method is more efficient (not locking-unlocking all the time), however, the program may need to keep checking the output of every read and write to see if they were successful. The second method automatically handles the locking and so the programmer wouldn't even know the lock is there.

Note: This is not code for copy-paste. It shows a concept and sketches how it's done. Please don't comment saying you forgot some error checking somewhere.

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Method 2: That certainly works, by I need to keep my objects locked for a certain amount of lines-of-code, not just inside setters and getters. –  Gabriel Sep 13 '11 at 13:39
    
Try the first method then. If you like, you can add logs where the m.is_locked() fails so that the programmer who is using your code, when testing his program, would see the logs and you'd help him that way. –  Shahbaz Sep 13 '11 at 13:41
    
Method 1: I'd have to test every sigle setter and getter? I really don't like the Get(var&) syntax, I find it too counter-intuitive. Think of bool Get(bool&)... What about bool Get(int*&)? After 2 days I'd think it returns false then the pointer "returned" is NULL. –  Gabriel Sep 13 '11 at 13:44
    
You are right, I don't like it myself either. Personally, if I had to do this, I would write the setter/getters the normal way, checking is_locked() and wouldn't do anything if it failed. I would however, in those cases set some error somewhere or log it somewhere to be a guide for the programmer using your code to try to find out where he forgot to lock. –  Shahbaz Sep 13 '11 at 14:17
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This sounds a lot like Alexandrescu's idea with volatile. You're not using the actual semantics of const, but rather exploiting the way the type system uses it. In this regard, I would prefer Alexandrescu's use of volatile: const has very definite and well understood semantics, and subverting them will definitely cause confusion for anyone reading or maintaining the code. volatile is more appropriate, as it has no well defined semantics, and in the context of most applications, is not used for anything else.

And rather than returning a classical proxy object, you should return a smart pointer. You could actually use shared_ptr for this, grabbing the lock before returning the value, and releasing it in the deleter (rather than deleting the object); I rather fear, however, that this would cause some confusion amongst the readers, and I would probably go with a custom smart pointer (probably using shared_ptr with the custom deleter in the implementation). (From your description, I suspect that this is closer to what you had in mind anyway.)

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