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I am building a Calendar object. It is important that I have both a date object and date as a string.

class Calendar

  def initialize(on, off, date_string)
    @on = on.to_i
    @off = off.to_i
    @date_string = date_string
  end
end

I have a method that converts the date to a date Object. How to do I handle that in initialize. Do I put in a dummy value and then call it later? Do I call it from inside initialize. What is more idiomatic Ruby?

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1  
You're likely going to want to have attr_accessors setup for this so you can read/write the attributes. –  Caley Woods Sep 13 '11 at 14:20
    
@Caley, I was planning on doing that as well. I'm kinda new to this, so I'm reading up on them to make sure I understand them. –  Noah Clark Sep 13 '11 at 14:23
1  
Sure! Just making sure you didn't get this fixed and then run into an issue with undefined variables etc. –  Caley Woods Sep 13 '11 at 14:24
    
@Caley, (@on) and (@off) should never change. Should those be attr_reader only then? Thanks for pointing that out. –  Noah Clark Sep 13 '11 at 14:27
1  
Yes, and if you ever try something like c = Calendar.new("1", "2", "1/4/2011") and then try to set on or off with c.on = "10" you'll get an undefined method for on=. –  Caley Woods Sep 13 '11 at 14:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd put it right in the initializer like this:

class Calendar

  DATE_FORMAT = "%d/%m/%Y"

  def initialize(on, off, date_string)
    @on = on.to_i
    @off = off.to_i
    @date = Date.strptime(date_string, DATE_FORMAT)
  end
end
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Would you also keep date_string so that I can use it later when printing to a webpage? –  Noah Clark Sep 13 '11 at 14:21
    
@NoahClark is this rails? If you're using rails you get a lot of helpers in ActiveSupport that make this easier. –  Caley Woods Sep 13 '11 at 14:25
1  
@Caley, no it is Ruby + Sinatra. I could always use the ActiveSupport gem though. –  Noah Clark Sep 13 '11 at 14:28
    
@NoahClark Ok cool, just checking. You could still require ActiveSupport/time I believe if you started getting into a lot of Date handling and wanted some of the helpers (or write you're own!). Edit: Sorry didn't notice you'd already said the activesupport gem :D –  Caley Woods Sep 13 '11 at 14:33
    
@NoahClark I might also save the initial string. But more likely, I'd store the base Date object and convert it to the appropriate format at the point of preparing it for presentation. –  Kevin Bedell Sep 13 '11 at 14:35

The more object-oriented way is to convert as early as possible, and to keep the rich object (here: Date) inside your new object. You have perhaps to convert the given date_or_string into a date.

Implementation could be:

class Calendar
  def initialize(on, off, date_or_string)
    @on = on.to_i
    @off = off.to_i
    @date = convert_to_date(date_or_string)
  end

  def convert_to_date(date_or_string)
     ... # Implementation here
  end
end
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1  
need to call convert_to_date() in the constructor here instead of to_date –  Caley Woods Sep 13 '11 at 14:18
    
Thank's missed that ... –  mliebelt Sep 13 '11 at 14:31
3  
One thing I like about calling out a separate method to do the date conversion is that it may make it easier to develop test code that exercises the date conversion logic in a more isolated way. –  Kevin Bedell Sep 13 '11 at 14:33

You might want to try writing an assignment method:

def date=(date_string)
  @date = ...(date_string)
end

It may be useful to convert the others in a similar fashion if required, then declare the read accessors, if applicable:

attr_reader :on, :off, :date

In your constructor you'd simply exercise this:

def initialize(on, off, date_string)
  self.on = on
  self.off = off
  self.date = date_string
end
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2  
This also has the advantage of allowing the date conversion capability to be tested in a more isolated way. –  Kevin Bedell Sep 13 '11 at 14:50

I'm not sure whether it's a good idea to have too much logic in your initialize method - it means less flexibility in how you create your object. For example, I'd have

class Calendar

  def self.new_using_strings(on_string, off_string, date_string)
    on = on_string.to_i # Or Integer(on_string)
    off = off_string.to_i # Or Integer(off_string)
    date = convert_to_date(date_string)
    new(on, off, date)
  end

  def self.convert_to_date(date_string)
    # Implementation goes here
  end

  def initialize(on, off, date)
    @on, @off, @date = on, off, date
  end
end

That way, if I want to create a calendar object using a date rather than a date string, then I can do that.

I haven't seen anyone else take that approach, however.

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