Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When should I use code snippet A instead of snippet B (i.e. what are the benefits of using snippet A)?:

Snippet A:

try {
    // codeblock A
}
catch (Exception ex) {
    // codeblock B
}
finally {
    //codeblock C
}

Snippet B:

try {
    // codeblock A
}
catch (Exception ex) {
    // codeblock B
}

//codeblock C
share|improve this question
    
+1: Nice question. –  Martijn Courteaux Sep 13 '11 at 17:08
1  
possible duplicate of What is the gist of finally block in Java? –  Oli Charlesworth Sep 13 '11 at 17:09
1  
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Use a finally block if you have code that must execute regardless of whether or not an exception is thrown.

Cleaning up scarce resources like database connections are a good example.

share|improve this answer
    
It's also good practice because it explicitly states what is going on, e.g. regardless of execution we must free resource x, etc. –  Tony Sep 13 '11 at 17:10
    
Note, in Java 7 you can use a try-with-resources statement to close certain resources, so you wouldn't need a finally in this case. –  dogbane Sep 13 '11 at 17:13
1  
@duffymo But wouldn't codeblock C in snippet B also take care of this? –  poplitea Sep 13 '11 at 17:22
2  
Not guaranteed if someone puts a return in the catch block. –  duffymo Sep 13 '11 at 17:23
    
@duffymo Ah, that explains very much. Thanks a lot! –  poplitea Sep 13 '11 at 17:28
add comment

An obvious case is when you re-raise or throw another exception in your catch block.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It's useful if you need to do some cleanup, e.g. close a database connection. Because "finally" is executed always, you don't need to do the bug-prone copy-paste of the same code in the end of the "try" and in also in one or more "catch" blocks.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You must almost always use the snippet with finally block when you have resources that needs clean up in both successful or error scenarios. A typical example is the jdbc connection object which should always be closed (clean up) in the finally block.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The finally block always executes when the try block exits. This ensures that the finally block is executed even if an unexpected exception occurs. But finally is useful for more than just exception handling — it allows the programmer to avoid having cleanup code accidentally bypassed by a return, continue, or break. Putting cleanup code in a finally block is always a good practice, even when no exceptions are anticipated.

The try block of the writeList method that you've been working with here opens a PrintWriter. The program should close that stream before exiting the writeList method. This poses a somewhat complicated problem because writeList's try block can exit in one of three ways.

  1. The new FileWriter statement fails and throws an IOException.
  2. The vector.elementAt(i) statement fails and throws an ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException.
  3. Everything succeeds and the try block exits normally.

The runtime system always executes the statements within the finally block regardless of what happens within the try block. So it's the perfect place to perform cleanup.

The following finally block for the writeList method cleans up and then closes the PrintWriter.

finally {
   if (out != null) { 
       System.out.println("Closing PrintWriter");
       out.close(); 
    } else { 
             System.out.println("PrintWriter not open");
    } 
} 

In the writeList example, you could provide for cleanup without the intervention of a finally block. For example, you could put the code to close the PrintWriter at the end of the try block and again within the exception handler for ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException, as follows.

try {

      out.close();       //Don't do this; it duplicates code. 

    } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
      out.close();       //Don't do this; it duplicates code.
      System.err.println("Caught: FileNotFoundException: " 
                  + e.getMessage());
      throw new RuntimeException(e);

 } catch (IOException e) {
    System.err.println("Caught IOException: " 
                  + e.getMessage());

}

However, this duplicates code, thus making the code difficult to read and error-prone should you modify it later. For example, if you add code that can throw a new type of exception to the try block, you have to remember to close the PrintWriter within the new exception handler.

share|improve this answer
1  
Taken from download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/exceptions/…. Please reference the source in the future. –  dogbane Sep 13 '11 at 17:15
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.