Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to handle a bunch of similar but exclusively called function from a single method. e.g. (maybe not a great example)

class Util(object):
    def method1(self):
        return "method1", [1,2,3]

    def method2(self):
        return "method2", {"1":4, "2":5, "3":6}

    def method3(self):
        return [1,2,3], "method3", {"1":4, "2":5, "3":6}

    def call_method(self, method_func):
        if method_func.__name__ == "method1":
            (name, dict_values) = self.method_func()
        if method_func.__name__ == "method2":
            (name, list_values) = self.method_func()
        if method_func.__name__ == "method3":
            (list_values, name, dict_values) = self.method_func()
        # How best to manage a return for 3 optional, but not inter-dependent values?
        return name, dict_values, list_values

if __name__ = "__main__":
    u = Util()
    (name, dict_values, list_values) = u.call_method(Util.method1)

The call_method() return is what I'm trying to visualize here. I've got a bunch of exclusive sub-calls I need to make and I need to massage them into something that can be returned.

Would it be easier to just stuff them into Util class member variables? And whoever implements u.call_method() will simply need to know what to look for?

Before anyone complains about the design in the first place, it's not mine. I simply need to expose a consistent API and an interested to hear opinons on how to handle a return like this. It's not easily normalized, and though a missing trailing return value will pass the Runtime, a leading one won't.

Any tips would be great! Thank you.

share|improve this question
2  
What's wrong with return name, dict_values, list_values? I don't understand what problem you have? –  S.Lott Sep 13 '11 at 18:05
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you need to group several values often an approach is using a dictionary... i.e. changing your code to:

...
def method1(self):
    return {"name": "method 1",
            "list": [1, 2, 3]}

Something that is possible in Python is to use an object instead of a dictionary to make the code nicer to read:

class Bunch:
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        self.__dict__.update(kwargs)

...
def method1(self):
    return Bunch(name="method1",
                 list=[1, 2, 3])

so that the caller can use result.name instead of result["name"].

Another option that recently got standardized in Python is the NamedTuple.

share|improve this answer
    
I like it. Thank you for the feedback. –  garlicman Sep 13 '11 at 18:45
    
namedtuple (below) does that with little bit cleaner way and you can still use tuple-like unpacking values –  Mikko Ohtamaa Sep 13 '11 at 18:55
    
You do not need Bunch, you just can use dict(name="method", list=[1,2,3]) –  rocksportrocker Sep 13 '11 at 21:24
    
@rocksportrocker: The point of bunch is using result.name instead of result["name"]. –  6502 Sep 14 '11 at 6:56
    
@Mikko Ohtamaa: thanks for the downvote if it's yours. My answer also cites NamedTuple that may be available if you're using Python 2.6+. The bunch recipe still has a place (it's mutable and that's sometimes useful, also it doesn't require to define a class). –  6502 Sep 15 '11 at 8:23
add comment

namedtuple is very Pythonic alternative for returning "nameless" tuples

http://docs.python.org/library/collections.html#collections.namedtuple

This way the caller does not need to extract all tuple members if it needs read only some of them.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for namedtuples! Anywhere you return a tuple, change your code to return a namedtuple instead. Do it. –  jathanism Sep 13 '11 at 18:46
    
The only niggle with namedtuples is the fixed field set. There's no apparent way to default non-set fields to None or something else. e.g. in one case only 2 of 3 fields are available for population, in another case 3 of 3 fields are available. You have to always populate all the fields defined in the namedtuple. It would be awesome if I could set a default value for missing fields when constructing a namedtuple. –  garlicman Sep 14 '11 at 15:02
    
Python has None for that purpose :) But docs claim you could probably create your own namedtuple implementation (subclass) which initializes all values to None. –  Mikko Ohtamaa Sep 14 '11 at 15:26
add comment

If you can modify the methods:

class Util(object):
    def method1(self):
        return "method1", [1,2,3], None

    def method2(self):
        return "method2", None, {"1":4, "2":5, "3":6}

    def method3(self):
        return "method3", [1,2,3], {"1":4, "2":5, "3":6}

    def call_method(self, method_func):
        return method_func(self)    

if __name__ == "__main__":
    u = Util() 
    (name, dict_values, list_values) = u.call_method(Util.method1)
    # better:
    print u.method1()

And if you can not change:

class Util(object):
    def method1(self):
        return "method1", [1,2,3]

    def method2(self):
        return "method2", {"1":4, "2":5, "3":6}

    def method3(self):
        return "method3", [1,2,3], {"1":4, "2":5, "3":6}

    def call_method(self, method_func):
        results = method_func(self) 
        name = list_ = dict_ = None   
        for obj in results:
            if isinstance(obj, string):
               name = obj
            elif isinstance(obj, list):
               list_ = obj
            elif isinstacne(obj, dict):
               dict_ = obj
        return name, dict_, list_

if __name__ == "__main__":
    u = Util() 
    (name, dict_values, list_values) = u.call_method(Util.method1)
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.