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I have a class MyClassA that has an IList property. I am using a PropertyGrid control to display all the properties of MyClassA and I would like the list of MyClassB to be displayed and editable via the PropertyGrid for MyClassA.

I currently have all the other properties being displayed in the Property grid except for the property that is the list of MyClassB. How do I go about adding the List of MyClassB to the property grid where the user can add/edit/remove items from the List?

I haven't really been able to find any examples that go into detail on this as of yet although I am still digging.

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So you have a list within a list and you wish to display that list with some sort of custom editor for your pGrid? –  Ty Rozak Sep 13 '11 at 20:47
    
More or less. I have a list of MyClassA in my Main. That list of MyClassA is bound to the pGrid. Each MyClassA has a list of MyClassB's associated with it. I'd like to display all the MyClassB's in the list for the MyClassA that is currently being displayed, and allow the user to edit each MyClassB associated with it or add a new MyClassB to the list of MyClassBs contained in MyClassA. Does that make sense? –  Nathan Raley Sep 13 '11 at 20:52
    
This kind of customization would require you to create a custom editor for your grid, that when given a property of a certain type, it displays them using a custom user control. If I am understanding correctly. –  Ty Rozak Sep 13 '11 at 20:55
    
To put it in a more contextual sense. I have a list of Intersections. Each Intersection has a list of Zones associated with it. The Intersection is bound to the PropertyGrid. I'd like to have the Zones property, which is a IList<Zones>, be displayed with the functionality to: edit or remove any Zone currently contained in the Zones List and/or add a new Zone to the List of Zones. –  Nathan Raley Sep 13 '11 at 20:56
    
How would one go about doing this? You know of any reference showing how to achieve this? –  Nathan Raley Sep 13 '11 at 20:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is a solution I have worked out so far, although it still doesn't fit in 100% to what I am looking for.

I found this reference to modify for my liking: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/tabs/customizingcollectiondata.aspx

What I did was create a new class that inherits from CollectionBase and that uses an ICustomTypeDescriptor.

After I did this and implemented the basic functionality, I had to create a PropertyDescriptor for the class.

Here is the code:

public class ZoneCollection : CollectionBase, ICustomTypeDescriptor
{
    #region Collection Implementation

    /// <summary>
    /// Adds an zone object to the collection
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="emp"></param>
    public void Add(Zone zone)
    {
        this.List.Add(zone);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Removes an zone object from the collection
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="emp"></param>
    public void Remove(Zone zone)
    {
        this.List.Remove(zone);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Returns an zone object at index position.
    /// </summary>
    public Zone this[int index]
    {
        get
        {
            return (Zone)this.List[index];
        }
    }

    #endregion

    // Implementation of interface ICustomTypeDescriptor 
    #region ICustomTypeDescriptor impl

    public String GetClassName()
    {
        return TypeDescriptor.GetClassName(this, true);
    }

    public AttributeCollection GetAttributes()
    {
        return TypeDescriptor.GetAttributes(this, true);
    }

    public String GetComponentName()
    {
        return TypeDescriptor.GetComponentName(this, true);
    }

    public TypeConverter GetConverter()
    {
        return TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(this, true);
    }

    public EventDescriptor GetDefaultEvent()
    {
        return TypeDescriptor.GetDefaultEvent(this, true);
    }

    public PropertyDescriptor GetDefaultProperty()
    {
        return TypeDescriptor.GetDefaultProperty(this, true);
    }

    public object GetEditor(Type editorBaseType)
    {
        return TypeDescriptor.GetEditor(this, editorBaseType, true);
    }

    public EventDescriptorCollection GetEvents(Attribute[] attributes)
    {
        return TypeDescriptor.GetEvents(this, attributes, true);
    }

    public EventDescriptorCollection GetEvents()
    {
        return TypeDescriptor.GetEvents(this, true);
    }

    public object GetPropertyOwner(PropertyDescriptor pd)
    {
        return this;
    }


    /// <summary>
    /// Called to get the properties of this type. Returns properties with certain
    /// attributes. this restriction is not implemented here.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="attributes"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public PropertyDescriptorCollection GetProperties(Attribute[] attributes)
    {
        return GetProperties();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Called to get the properties of this type.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public PropertyDescriptorCollection GetProperties()
    {
        // Create a collection object to hold property descriptors
        PropertyDescriptorCollection pds = new PropertyDescriptorCollection(null);

        // Iterate the list of employees
        for (int i = 0; i < this.List.Count; i++)
        {
            // Create a property descriptor for the zone item and add to the property descriptor collection
            ZoneCollectionPropertyDescriptor pd = new ZoneCollectionPropertyDescriptor(this, i);
            pds.Add(pd);
        }
        // return the property descriptor collection
        return pds;
    }

    #endregion
}

/// <summary>
/// Summary description for CollectionPropertyDescriptor.
/// </summary>
public class ZoneCollectionPropertyDescriptor : PropertyDescriptor
{
    private ZoneCollection collection = null;
    private int index = -1;

    public ZoneCollectionPropertyDescriptor(ZoneCollection coll, int idx) :
        base("#" + idx.ToString(), null)
    {
        this.collection = coll;
        this.index = idx;
    }

    public override AttributeCollection Attributes
    {
        get
        {
            return new AttributeCollection(null);
        }
    }

    public override bool CanResetValue(object component)
    {
        return true;
    }

    public override Type ComponentType
    {
        get
        {
            return this.collection.GetType();
        }
    }

    public override string DisplayName
    {
        get
        {
            Zone zone = this.collection[index];
            return zone.ID.ToString();
        }
    }

    public override string Description
    {
        get
        {
            Zone zone = this.collection[index];
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
            sb.Append(zone.ID.ToString());

            if ( zone.Streets.Route != String.Empty || zone.Streets.Crossing != String.Empty)
                sb.Append("::");
            if (zone.Streets.Route != String.Empty)
                sb.Append(zone.Streets.Route);
            if ( zone.Streets.Crossing != String.Empty)
            {
                sb.Append(" and ");
                sb.Append(zone.Streets.Crossing);
            }

            return sb.ToString();
        }
    }

    public override object GetValue(object component)
    {
        return this.collection[index];
    }

    public override bool IsReadOnly
    {
        get { return false; }
    }

    public override string Name
    {
        get { return "#" + index.ToString(); }
    }

    public override Type PropertyType
    {
        get { return this.collection[index].GetType(); }
    }

    public override void ResetValue(object component)
    {
    }

    public override bool ShouldSerializeValue(object component)
    {
        return true;
    }

    public override void SetValue(object component, object value)
    {
        // this.collection[index] = value;
    }
}

Intersection now contains a ZoneCollection instead of an IList and I can now edit/add/remove the zones contained within the collection.

Now, if I could make this more generic I'd be relatively happy. Another hindrance for my model is that I had to inherit from Collection base using this, instead of IList. This completely broke my mapping of my class for NHibernate and I'm now having to try and figure out how to remap this list using the method mentioned above.

If anyone wants to elaborate this any further I'd greatly appreciate some more insight.

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I know this Topic is more than 2 years old, but maybe this could be interesting for you.

I had a similar Problem. Starting with: I need a Point in 3D-Space which should be configurable in Property-Grid For this I created a Class Koord. To make it changeable in PropertyGrid, I created a new Class "KoordConverter : TypeConverter" This is used in a Vexel (check Wikipedia to find out what it's for :-) )

To create an TestBock (some 3D-Object) I'm using a List of Vexels. Unfortunately I need a List of TestBlocks in my Program, Visible through the Property-Grid.

To start Topmost:

public partial class FormMain : Form
{
    private BlockProperties _bp = new BlockProperties();

    public FormMain()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        pgProperties.SelectedObject = _bp;
    }
[...]
}

The Class BlockProperties includes the List of TestBocks which I filled a bit to show you what's inside.

class BlockProperties
{
    public List<TestBocks> Testing { get; set; }

    public BlockProperties()
    {
        Testing = new List<TestBocks>(3);

        List<Vexel> t1 = new List<Vexel>(1);
        t1.Add(new Vexel(new Koord(1,0,1), 1));

        List<Vexel> t2 = new List<Vexel>(2);
        t2.Add(new Vexel(new Koord(2, 0, 1), 2));
        t2.Add(new Vexel(new Koord(2, 0, 2), 2));

        List<Vexel> t3 = new List<Vexel>(3);
        t3.Add(new Vexel(new Koord(3, 0, 1), 3));
        t3.Add(new Vexel(new Koord(3, 0, 2), 3));
        t3.Add(new Vexel(new Koord(3, 0, 3), 3));

        TestBocks tb1 = new TestBocks();
        tb1.Koords = t1;

        TestBocks tb2 = new TestBocks();
        tb2.Koords = t2;

        TestBocks tb3 = new TestBocks();
        tb3.Koords = t3;

        Testing.Add(tb1);
        Testing.Add(tb2);
        Testing.Add(tb3);
    [...]
    }
[...]
}

Next is my TestBlock class, which is simply straight forward

[Serializable]
public class TestBocks
{
    public List<Vexel> Vexels{ get; set; }
    public TestBocks()
    {
        Vexels = new List<Vexel>();
    }
}

In the Vexels is most of the magic I need for my Program: I even put a ToString() here to make it easy during debugging.

public class Vexel
{
    private Koord _origin;
    private double _extent;

    public Koord Origin { get { return _origin; }  set { _origin = value; } }

    public double Extent { get { return _extent; } set { _extent = value; } }

    public string ToString()
    {
        NumberFormatInfo nFormatInfo = new NumberFormatInfo
        {
            NumberDecimalSeparator = ".",
            NumberGroupSeparator = ""
        }; 
        return String.Format(nFormatInfo, "Origin;{0};{1};{2};Extent;{3}", _origin.X, _origin.Y, _origin.Z, _extent);
    }

    public Vexel()
    {
        _origin = new Koord(0,0,0);
        Extent = 0;
    }

    public Vexel(Koord origin, double extent)
    {
        //TODO do some checking
        _origin = origin;
        _extent = extent;
    }

So far everything worked fine for the PropertyGrid, but I could not edit the Koords. The Class was pretty simple but not editable in the PropertyGrid. Adding a TypeConverterClass solved this Problem (you can find the TypeConverter below the code of the Koord)

[TypeConverter(typeof(KoordConverter))]
[Serializable]
public class Koord
{
    private double p_1;
    private double p_2;
    private double p_3;

    public Koord(double x, double y, double z)
    {
        this.p_1 = x;
        this.p_2 = y;
        this.p_3 = z;
    }

    public string ToString()
    {
        return String.Format("X;{0};Y;{1};Z;{2}", p_1, p_2, p_3);
    }

    public double X { get { return p_1; } }
    public double Y { get { return p_2; } }
    public double Z { get { return p_3; } }
}

The Typeconverter was the most complicated code to write. You can find it below:

public class KoordConverter : TypeConverter
{
    public override bool CanConvertFrom(ITypeDescriptorContext context, Type sourceType)
    {
        return sourceType == typeof(string) || base.CanConvertFrom(context, sourceType);
    }

    public override bool CanConvertTo(ITypeDescriptorContext context, Type destinationType)
    {
        return destinationType == typeof(InstanceDescriptor) || base.CanConvertTo(context, destinationType);
    }

    public override object ConvertFrom(ITypeDescriptorContext context, CultureInfo culture, object value)
    {
        string text = value as string;
        if (text == null)
        {
            return base.ConvertFrom(context, culture, value);
        }
        string text2 = text.Trim();
        if (text2.Length == 0)
        {
            return null;
        }
        if (culture == null)
        {
            culture = CultureInfo.CurrentCulture;
        }
        char c = culture.TextInfo.ListSeparator[0];
        string[] array = text2.Split(new char[]
        {
            c
        });
        int[] array2 = new int[array.Length];
        TypeConverter converter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(typeof(int));
        for (int i = 0; i < array2.Length; i++)
        {
            array2[i] = (int)converter.ConvertFromString(context, culture, array[i]);
        }
        if (array2.Length == 3)
        {
            return new Koord(array2[0], array2[1], array2[2]);
        }
        throw new ArgumentException("TextParseFailedFormat");
    }

    public override object ConvertTo(ITypeDescriptorContext context, CultureInfo culture, object value, Type destinationType)
    {
        if (destinationType == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("destinationType");
        }
        if (value is Koord)
        {
            if (destinationType == typeof(string))
            {
                Koord Koord = (Koord)value;
                if (culture == null)
                {
                    culture = CultureInfo.CurrentCulture;
                }
                string separator = culture.TextInfo.ListSeparator + " ";
                TypeConverter converter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(typeof(int));
                string[] array = new string[3];
                int num = 0;
                array[num++] = converter.ConvertToString(context, culture, Koord.X);
                array[num++] = converter.ConvertToString(context, culture, Koord.Y);
                array[num++] = converter.ConvertToString(context, culture, Koord.Z);
                return string.Join(separator, array);
            }
            if (destinationType == typeof(InstanceDescriptor))
            {
                Koord Koord2 = (Koord)value;
                ConstructorInfo constructor = typeof(Koord).GetConstructor(new Type[]
                {
                    typeof(double),
                    typeof(double),
                    typeof(double)
                });
                if (constructor != null)
                {
                    return new InstanceDescriptor(constructor, new object[]
                    {
                        Koord2.X,
                        Koord2.Y,
                        Koord2.Z
                    });
                }
            }
        }
        return base.ConvertTo(context, culture, value, destinationType);
    }

    public override object CreateInstance(ITypeDescriptorContext context, IDictionary propertyValues)
    {
        if (propertyValues == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("propertyValues");
        }
        object obj = propertyValues["X"];
        object obj2 = propertyValues["Y"];
        object obj3 = propertyValues["Z"];
        if (obj == null || obj2 == null || obj3 == null || !(obj is double) || !(obj2 is double) || !(obj3 is double))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("PropertyValueInvalidEntry");
        }
        return new Koord((double)obj, (double)obj2, (double)obj3);
    }

    public override bool GetCreateInstanceSupported(ITypeDescriptorContext context)
    {
        return true;
    }

    public override PropertyDescriptorCollection GetProperties(ITypeDescriptorContext context, object value, Attribute[] attributes)
    {
        PropertyDescriptorCollection properties = TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(typeof(Koord), attributes);
        return properties.Sort(new string[]
        {
            "X",
            "Y",
            "Z"
        });
    }

    public override bool GetPropertiesSupported(ITypeDescriptorContext context)
    {
        return true;
    }
}

Basically after all of this was set up, It was no ploblem to modify any List of objects (TestBlocks or the Vexels within each TestBlock) Hope it helps someone if they step over this Thread.

Best Regards

Robin Blood

PS:Editing is no problem in the PropertyGrid, maybe you just didn't get your constructors right !? http://i.stack.imgur.com/LD3zf.png

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