Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Lets say I have this in my controller

@appointment.add_appointer

Is there a shortcut in Textmate to jump to the add_appointer function definition in my appointment.rb model?

share|improve this question
1  
it's supposed to be ^ f but it's not that efficient. –  apneadiving Sep 13 '11 at 21:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

No, unfortunately. I think the fastest way is to probably use:

Command+T <type appointment.rb>

Now in open file

Command+Shift+T <type method name>
share|improve this answer

The beauty of TextMate is that it can be simply extended to fulfil you needs!
I've written a TextMate Bundle command (you can easily assign it to Ctrl+] for example) that lookup for the definition of the class or method under the caret and displays it in a tooltip, along with the file name and the line where it was find.

Check it out: Add a shortcut to TextMate to lookup a class or method definition in a tooltip

share|improve this answer
    
that's great, I am using it now. Is there any way for it to go to the file and line, where it found the method/class definition? –  alik Oct 11 '11 at 1:48
    
That's a good idea. Textmate already has a Jump to method definition in the Ruby on Rails bundle (just press 'CTRL+F'). However it is obsolete code and often I find this a little too intrusive, sometimes I just want to take a look at the parameters or recall where the method or class was defined. So I have rewritten the code (check the previous link) to copy the matching file to the clipboard, so if you want only to have a glance at the definition in tooltip just press CTRL+], and when you want to jump to that file you can then press CTRL+L and CTRL+V. You can even jump to the line with CMD+L –  Claudio Floreani Oct 11 '11 at 11:17
    
@ClaudioFloreani Extremely helpful utility. I think you mean CMD+T and CMD+V to jump to a different file (as it states in your post), followed by CMD+L in either case. –  jordanpg Jun 19 '12 at 20:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.