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How would you rewrite this? It works, but it has been thrown together. Purpose: If you click anywhere within a td element that contains a checkbox, then the checkbox is selected.

$('td input').filter(':checkbox').each(function() {
    $(this).closest('td').addClass('CursorPointer');
});
$('td.CursorPointer').click(function() {
    $('input:checkbox',this).click();
});
$('input:checkbox').click(function(myEvent) {
    myEvent.stopPropagation();
});

I wonder if this is a good example of adding an event listener, or using the delegate method.

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Could you make a jsfiddle.net out of this, with some actual html? Easier to play with. –  hookedonwinter Sep 13 '11 at 21:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
$('td').has(':checkbox').addClass('CursorPointer').click(function(e) {
    $('input:checkbox',this).click();
}).find(':checkbox').click(function(e){
    e.stopPropagation();
});

Here's a jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/gislikonrad/5G7ee/

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First:

$('td input').filter(':checkbox').each(function() {
    $(this).closest('td').addClass('CursorPointer');
});

Is the same as:

 $('td').has(':checkbox').addClass('CursorPointer');

Secondly Similar to sdleihssirhc but targeting a specific element (best not to overload document with too many bubbling events).

$('#my-table-id').delegate('.CursorPointer', 'click', function () {
    $(':checkbox', this).click();
}).delegate('input:checkbox', 'click', function (e) {
    e.stopPropagation();
});
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First: I think you copied the wrong code from the OP... Second: you don't have a second point... –  Gísli Konráð Sep 13 '11 at 23:50

The .click method in jQuery attaches a click event listener to every single element in the matched group, so yeah, it would probably be a little more efficient if you changed both of those to use event delegation:

$(document).delegate('td.CursorPointer', 'click', function () {
    $('input:checkbox', this).click();
}).delegate('input:checkbox', 'click', function (myEvent) {
    myEvent.stopPropagation();
});

There's probably a very slightly more efficient way to phrase that in jQuery, but that's the essential idea.

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I always forget about delegate... +1 –  Gísli Konráð Sep 14 '11 at 0:03
1  
Applying delegate to the document will most likely be less performant if the document gets more and more delegates. Best to target a specific element such as $('#my-table').delegate( –  martin Sep 14 '11 at 4:17
    
Also thanks for editing my response - I'm tired :) –  martin Sep 14 '11 at 4:23

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