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I am designing a c# class and would like to know if my design is right.

abstract class PersonBase
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public PersonBase Parent { get; set; }
    public List<PersonBase> Children { get; set; }

}

class Person : PersonBase
{
    //public override List<Person> Children { get; set; }

    public Person()
    {
        Children = new List<PersonBase>();
    }

    public void Add(Person child)
    {
        child.Parent = this;
        Children.Add(child);
    }
}

test code:

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Person parent = new Person();
    parent.Name = "parent";

    Person child = new Person();
    child.Name = "child1";
    child.Add(new Person() { Name = "grandchild1" });

    parent.Add(child);

}

It works as expected. I am able to access the parent children objects from anywhere in the hierarchy. My concern is it looks recursive or circular reference (can't find the right word here).

Here is what I did finally:

public class Person
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public Person Parent { get; set; }
    public List<Person> Children { get; private set; }

    public Person()
    {
        Children = new List<Person>();
    }

    public void AddChild(Person child)
    {
        if (child == this) { return; }
        if (Children.Contains(child)) { return; }

        child.Parent = this;
        Children.Add(child);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
It's not recursive. Are you only going to have those getters and setters in there? I ask because if you are not going to give the Inherited class any default functionality, it should probably be an interface. –  Cubicle.Jockey Sep 13 '11 at 22:21
2  
Why do you need a PersonBase class at all? Shouldn't the "base" of the person hierarchy be Person itself? –  LukeH Sep 13 '11 at 22:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Like @LukeH asked your break out of BasePerson and Person do not make sense. This will work just fine.

public class Person
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public Person Parent { get; set; }
    public IList<Person> Children { get; private set; }

    public Person()
    {
        Children = new List<Person>();
    }

    public void Add(Person child)
    {
        child.Parent = this;
        Children.Add(child);
    }
}

If you are going to have different kinds of Person then you might want to break you stuff out into an Interface if there is not inherited logic and an abstract class if you want to provide some default logic.

EDIT: Adding expressed issues from Danny

share|improve this answer
    
with IEnumerable I couldn't do Children.Add, so I used List<Person> –  gangt Sep 13 '11 at 23:26
    
Oops sorry I mean IList, that's my bad I will fix it. –  Cubicle.Jockey Sep 13 '11 at 23:29
    
I never had a clear idea on when to use Abstract class. I use it when I know I'm going to use it as a template class, and extend it as needed on the derived classes. –  gangt Sep 13 '11 at 23:33
1  
For me I always try to work with the Interfaces, this is so if someone decides they want to write their own version of List and inherit from IList, you can plug there custom version in without having to come modify you own class. For when to use Abstract vs Interface is basically if you are going to provide logic or not. If the logic is completely up to them use Interface, if you want to give them logic use abstract. "I never had a clear idea on when to use Abstract class. I use it when I know I'm going to use it as a template class, and extend it as needed on the derived classes." –  Cubicle.Jockey Sep 14 '11 at 4:25
1  
But it's a style thing and may not always be applicable so you will need to judge what works best for your case. I like to use IEnumerable<T> for most things because then someone using my class can give me an array or a list for examples and my code doesn't care. –  Cubicle.Jockey Sep 14 '11 at 4:27
//Declare and initialize Person a, b, c;
a.Add(c);
b.Add(c); // Now a thinks c is a child, but c does not think a is a parent!

You need some sort of validation, perhaps that c doesn't already have a parent, or set the parent/child only in a Parent.CreateChild method. Or allow it to have multiple parents.

(Also, I would declare the method AddChild, since that's what it's doing. And also pay attention to the design considerations from other commenters.)

Perhaps this:

class Person
{
    public string Name { get; private set; }
    public Person Parent { get; private set; }
    public IList<Person> Children { get; private set; }

    private Person() {} // Private constructor

    public static Person CreatePersonNoParent(string name){*implementation elided*};
    public Person CreateChild(string name)
    {
        Person child = new Person { Name=name, Parent=this };
        this.Children.Add(child);
        return child;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The base class seams redundant, also, you are assuming children is not null and assigning in constructor, yet it has a public setter.

Change children's setter to private or protected and don't worry about circular reference - just mark parent property with an attribute to prevent it from being serialized.

share|improve this answer
    
This is going to be on WCF, and I had problems when I set the setter to private. –  gangt Sep 13 '11 at 23:31
    
You could have a readonly field behind the property and in the property's setter clear the collection and add items to it (if new value != field collection of course). XAML serializers (e.g. WPF) don't agree with this however - they know how to add items instead of building a collection. If you need both to work an alternative is to have an additional property for WCF serialization that clears and adds items in its setter but is attribute hidden from other mechanisms. –  Danny Varod Sep 13 '11 at 23:42
    
Sounds interesting, I'm going to try it. I need to understand it first. –  gangt Sep 13 '11 at 23:59

It could become a problem if you used child.Add(Me or MyParent or ancestor). Then it would be an endless loop of references. You might want to add code in the Add method to prevent improper usage so a 'Person' can not add itself or it's parents as a child.

share|improve this answer
    
Another option would be to require a reference to ones parent in the constructor of Person. That way one can't be born without a parent in the first place :) –  M3NTA7 Sep 13 '11 at 22:30
    
I added code to prevent improper usage. Thanks. –  gangt Sep 13 '11 at 23:24

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