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I am trying to do a SQL select on a table based on two columns, but not in the usual way where the combination of values in both columns must be unique; I want to select where the value can only appear once in either column. Given the dataset:

|pkid | fkself | otherData |
|-----+--------+-----------|
|  1  |   4    |   there   |
|  4  |   1    |    will   |
|  3  |   6    |     be    |
|  2  |   5    |    other  |
|  5  |   2    |   data    |
|  6  |   3    |  columns  |

I need to return either

|pkid | fkself | otherData |
|-----+--------+-----------|
|  1  |   4    |   there   |
|  3  |   6    |     be    |
|  2  |   5    |    other  |

or

|pkid | fkself | otherData |
|-----+--------+-----------|
|  4  |   1    |    will   |
|  5  |   2    |   data    |
|  6  |   3    |  columns  |

The only way I can think of to do this is to concatenate `pkid and fkid in order so that both row 1 and row 2 would concatenate to 1,4, but I'm not sure how to do that, or if it is even possible.

The rows will have other data columns, but it does not matter which row I get, only that I get each ID only once, whether the value is in pkid or fkself.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use least and greatest to get the smallest or biggest value of the two. That allows you to put them in the right order to generate those keys for you. You could concatenate the values as you suggested, but it's not needed in this solution. With dense_rank you can generate a sequence for each of those fictional keys. Then, you can get the first OtherData from that sequence.

select
  pkid,
  fkself,
  otherData
from
  (select
    pkid,
    fkself,
    otherData,
    dense_rank() over (partition by least(pkid, fkself), greatest(pkid, fkself) order by pkid) as rank
  from
    YourTable t)
where
  rank = 1
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If I'm understanding what this does correctly, couldn't I just do: select pkid, fkself, otherData, dense_rank() over (partition by least(pkid, fkself), greatest(pkid, fkself) order by pkid) as rank from YourTable t) where rank = 1 That woul give me an extra column but that could be ignored when used. I'm creating this statement for a view inside an Oracle DB –  AsherMaximum Sep 13 '11 at 23:03
    
thanks, that seems to work. Now I just have to add the rest of my query to it! –  AsherMaximum Sep 14 '11 at 0:16
    
You need the subselect, because you cannot use the rank in the where clause of the same level. –  GolezTrol Sep 14 '11 at 10:12

Your idea is possible, and it should produce the results you want.

SELECT DISTINCT joinedID
FROM (
SELECT min(id) & "," & max(id) as joinedID
FROM (
    SELECT pkid as id, someUniqueValue 
    FROM table 
    UNION ALL 
    SELECT fkself as id, someUniqueValue 
    FROM table)
GROUP BY someUniqueValue )

This will give you a unique list of IDs, concatenated as you like. You can easily include other fields by adding them to each SELECT statement. Also, someUniqueValue can be either an existing unique field, a new unique field, or the concatenated pkid and fkself, if that combination is unique.

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The only way I can think of to do this is to concatenate `pkid and fkid in order so that both row 1 and row 2 would concatenate to 1,4, but I'm not sure how to do that, or if it is even possible.

You could do it using a CASE statement in Oracle:

SQL> SELECT * FROM sample
  2  /

      PKID     FKSELF
---------- ----------
         1          4
         4          1
         3          6
         2          5
         5          2
         7          7

6 rows selected.

SQL> l
  1  SELECT DISTINCT *
  2  FROM (
  3  SELECT CASE WHEN pkid <= fkself THEN pkid||','||fkself
  4                                  ELSE fkself||','||pkid
  5         END "JOINED"
  6    FROM sample
  7* )
SQL> /

JOINED
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1,4
2,5
3,6
7,7
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