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Given the following constructs for defining a function in Scala, can you explain what the difference is, and what the implications will be?

def foo = {}

vs.

def foo() = {}

Update

Thanks for the quick responses. These are great. The only question that remains for me is:

If I omit the parenthesis, is there still a way to pass the function around? This is what I get in the repl:

scala> def foo = {}
foo: Unit

scala> def baz() = {}
baz: ()Unit

scala> def test(arg: () => Unit) = { arg }
test: (arg: () => Unit)() => Unit

scala> test(foo)
<console>:10: error: type mismatch;
 found   : Unit
 required: () => Unit
              test(foo)
                   ^

scala> test(baz)
res1: () => Unit = <function0>

Update 2012-09-14

Here are some similar questions I noticed:

  1. Difference between function with parentheses and without
  2. Scala functions with no arguments
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1  
The def keyword defines a method, not a function, though the difference can often be subtle. Think along the same lines as int vs Integer in Java: the former can be autoboxed into the latter. –  Kevin Wright Sep 13 '11 at 23:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 18 down vote accepted

If you include the parentheses in the definition you can optionally omit them when you call the method. If you omit them in the definition you can't use them when you call the method.

scala> def foo() {}
foo: ()Unit

scala> def bar {}
bar: Unit

scala> foo

scala> bar()
<console>:12: error: Unit does not take parameters
       bar()
          ^

Additionally, you can do something similar with your higher order functions:

scala> def baz(f: () => Unit) {}
baz: (f: () => Unit)Unit

scala> def bat(f: => Unit) {}
bat: (f: => Unit)Unit

scala> baz(foo)    

scala> baz(bar)
<console>:13: error: type mismatch;
 found   : Unit
 required: () => Unit
       baz(bar)
           ^
scala> bat(foo)

scala> bat(bar)  // both ok

Here baz will only take foo() and not bar. What use this is, I don't know. But it does show that the types are distinct.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. If Scala programmers follow the rationale/design critera that Eugene Yokota cites, that would mean that "baz" accepts only functions that may have side effects, while "bat" also accepts functions without side effects. Not sure if there's any practical application for that; my gut feeling is that there might be more useful to be able to write a function that only accepts functions without side effects (because it does some sort of parallel processing and side effects might cause issues), but suggesting that the supplied function should have side effects might have its place. –  Theodore Murdock Oct 14 '14 at 20:34
    
"If you include the parentheses in the definition you can optionally omit them when you call the method. If you omit them in the definition you can't use them when you call the method." -> This helps explain a question I had about this comment in docs.scala-lang.org/tutorials/scala-for-java-programmers.html : "A small problem of the methods re and im is that, in order to call them, one has to put an empty pair of parenthesis after their name". In fact, the example they give with the method "def re() = real" does work with and without. Thank you. –  Matthew Cornell Jan 8 at 15:24

Let me copy my answer I posted on a duplicated question:

A Scala method of 0-arity can be defined with or without parentheses (). This is used to signal the user that the method has some kind of side-effect (like printing out to std out or destroying data), as opposed to the one without, which can later be implemented as val.

See Programming in Scala:

Such parameterless methods are quite common in Scala. By contrast, methods defined with empty parentheses, such as def height(): Int, are called empty-paren methods. The recommended convention is to use a parameterless method whenever there are no parameters and the method accesses mutable state only by reading fields of the containing object (in particular, it does not change mutable state).

This convention supports the uniform access principle [...]

To summarize, it is encouraged style in Scala to define methods that take no parameters and have no side effects as parameterless methods, i.e., leaving off the empty parentheses. On the other hand, you should never define a method that has side-effects without parentheses, because then invocations of that method would look like a field selection.

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1  
Thanks for describing the "why" behind the "what". –  RustyTheBoyRobot Jun 12 '13 at 19:57
    
On the other hand, you should never define a method that has side-effects without parentheses, because then invocations of that method would look like a field selection. - But invocation of a method defined with parens can still be called without parens, so I don't buy this argument. –  Andrew McKinlay Aug 12 '13 at 1:42

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