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I'm coding a random seat generator for an airplane and I'm using a FOR loop in it. The thing is, the occupied seats only show when everything is done. What I would like it to do was in each iteration, show the random seat selected. How would one do that?

Here's the code I'm using. The plane has 118 seats and I have a picturebox named "img_Seat_X" for each one of them. I know there's a better way to this, but that's I could think in a quick hour. Thanks in advance!

private void btn_WeightBalance_Populate_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
                int passengers = Convert.ToInt32(txt_WeightBalance_Passengers.Text);
                List<int> seats = new List<int> { }; numberofSeats = 119;

                if (rdb_WeightBalance_190.Checked == true)
                    numberofSeats = 107;

                for (int x = 0; x < Passengers; x++)
                {
                    int randomNumber = RandomNumber(1, numberofSeats);

                    if (seats.Contains(randomNumber))
                        x--;

                    else
                    {

                        seats.Add(randomNumber);

                        Control[] seat = this.panWeightBalance.Controls.Find("img_Seat_" + randomNumber, true);
                        seat[0].Visible = true;
                        seat[0].Refresh();
                    }
                }
}

Figured it out! A simple Refresh() in each iteration did the job! I also replaced the while loop with an if statement.

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2  
I suggest starting your variables lower-cased, in the normal .Net fashion. And the variable names aren't indicative of what they contain. Passengers is a number, but the name suggests it points to a class representing a group of people. This makes the code a little confusing. –  Amy Sep 14 '11 at 0:08
2  
If your seat assignment algorithm takes more than a millisecond then you are doing something wrong. Making it obvious how clever your algorithm to, typically, uninterested users is a mistake. They really don't care much about it, they just want to know where to sit down. Don't optimize code that doesn't need it. –  Hans Passant Sep 14 '11 at 0:27
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, required reading: The Windows Message Loop

@rice pointed out my obvious error, sorry for leading you down the wrong path, thanks rice.

Anyway, you can perform the work in a separate thread and post updates to the UI trhead using the BackgroundWorker class. Here is a simple example which updates a label on a form 100 times in response to a button click:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    BackgroundWorker _worker;
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        _worker = new BackgroundWorker();
        _worker.WorkerReportsProgress = true;
        _worker.DoWork += _worker_DoWork;
        _worker.ProgressChanged += _worker_ProgressChanged;
    }

    private void _worker_ProgressChanged( object sender, ProgressChangedEventArgs e )
    {
        label1.Text = e.UserState.ToString();
    }

    private void _worker_DoWork( object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e )
    {
        for( int i = 0; i < 100; ++i )
        {
            _worker.ReportProgress( i, i );
            // allow some time between each update,
            // for demonstration purposes only.
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep( 15 );
        }
    }   

    private void button1_Click( object sender, EventArgs e )
    {
        _worker.RunWorkerAsync();
    }
}
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Yes, the code in the question will cause paint operations to be posted to the windows message queue, but because the onclick event is busy running your algorithm, it will never actually get around to painting until your whole function is ended. That's why even though your code LOOKS like it updates the UI in the loop, it does not. It only updates the states of the UI pieces but does not literally render them. Definitely read the above link, understanding the special nature of the main UI thread is a breaktrhough moment. –  rice Sep 14 '11 at 0:10
    
@Ed S. It is still blocking the message pump, possibly letting a message get through during Invalidate(). It's still an incorrect answer, especially throwing in Sleep() during the Message Loop. –  Andrew Finnell Sep 14 '11 at 0:14
    
@rice: Der, you're right; it's been a while since I've had to work in a Windows UI apparently... you would need to forece an update of the message loop, i.e., DoEvents to do it this way. –  Ed S. Sep 14 '11 at 0:15
    
@Andrew: Yep yep, not sure what I was thinking with that. –  Ed S. Sep 14 '11 at 0:31
1  
@rice: The BackgroundWorker encapsulates some of that away from you. As the event handlers are run on the UI thread you will never get an exception due to accessing a control from a thread which it ws not created on. If you use a Thread or something else like it you will need to Invoke() the delegate which updates the UI asynchronously on the UI thread. If I recall correctly, accessing a control from another thread would not result in an exception in the .NET 1.1 days, but it certainly will now, and it is a bad idea in general –  Ed S. Sep 14 '11 at 1:38
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The code you're writing is only selecting random seats from a maximum of 119 seats. Even if you're using old hardware it should be blazzingly fast to run so I don't see why you need to show each seat as it is allocated. It seems to me that you should split the code up. calculate the seat allocations and then display them any which way you like.

Here's the code to randomly select the seats:

var passengers = Convert.ToInt32(txt_WeightBalance_Passengers.Text);
var numberofSeats = rdb_WeightBalance_190.Checked ? 107 : 119;

// Creates an array from 0 .. numberofSeats - 1
var seats = Enumerable.Range(0, numberofSeats).ToArray();

//Shuffle the first "passengers" elements of the array
for (var i = 0; i < passengers; i++)
{
    var j = RandomNumber(0, numberofSeats);
    var x = seats[i];
    seats[i] = seats[j];
    seats[j] = x;
}

//Find the first "passengers" count of seat controls
var controls = (
        from i in seats.Take(passengers)
        let c = this.Controls.Find("img_Seat_" + i, true).FirstOrDefault()
        where c != null
        select c
    ).ToArray();

Now to set the seat controls as visible just do this:

foreach (var c in controls)
{
    c.Visible = true;
}

If you have a specific need to run this in the background and update the UI as it does so, you could do this:

var t = new System.Threading.Thread(new ThreadStart(() =>
{
    foreach (var c in controls)
    {
        this.Invoke(new Action(() => c.Visible = true));
        // Thread.Sleep(100); // Slow it down if you wish...
    }
}));
t.Start();

Does this work for you?

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Essentially you need to spawn a background thread to do the processing, then use BeginInvoke to update the User Interface elements each time. There are some issues you will need to work out in this solution. The user can now continue to click the button and it will spawn additional background threads. The most common mechanism is to pop a progress dialog (I hate modal dialogs , so don't do this) or prevent the user from taking the action twice by disabling the button until the work is completed.

    private void btn_WeightBalance_Populate_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        int passengers = Convert.ToInt32(txt_WeightBalance_Passengers.Text);

        List<int> seats = new List<int> { }; numberofSeats = 119;

        if (rdb_WeightBalance_190.Checked == true)
            numberofSeats = 107;

        BackgroundWorker worker = new BackgroundWorker();
        worker.DoWork += delegate
        {
            for (int x = 0; x < passengers; x++)
            {
                int randomNumber = RandomNumber(1, numberofSeats);
                while (seats.Contains(randomNumber))
                {
                    randomNumber = RandomNumber(1, numberofSeats);
                }
                seats.Add(randomNumber);

                UpdateSeat(randomNumber);
            }
        };
        worker.RunWorkerAsync();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Update a seat control in the correct UI thread. If this
    /// method is invoked in a thread besides the UI thread it will use
    /// BeginInvoke to put it on the UI thread queue.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="seatNumber"></param>
    private void UpdateSeat (int seatNumber)
    {
        if (this.InvokeRequired)
        {
            this.BeginInvoke((Action)(() => UpdateSeat(seatNumber)));
        }
        else
        {
            Control[] seat = this.Controls.Find("img_Seat_" + seatNumber, true);
            seat[0].Visible = true;
        }
    }

There are additional issues that should be solved. Such as the assumption a Control will always exist when calling FindControl and not handling malformed numeric text in txt_WeightBalance_Passengers.

Update with 'cute' answer

    private void btn_WeightBalance_Populate_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        var passengers = Convert.ToInt32(txt_WeightBalance_Passengers.Text);
        numberofSeats = rdb_WeightBalance_190.Checked ? 107 : 119;
        var worker = new BackgroundWorker();
        worker.DoWork += delegate
        {
            var random = new Random();
            foreach (var seatNumber in Enumerable.Range(1, Int32.MaxValue).Select(r => random.Next(numberofSeats)).Distinct())
            {
                var randomSeat = seatNumber;
                BeginInvoke((Action)(() =>
                {
                    var seat = this.Controls.Find("img_Seat_" + randomSeat, true);
                    seat[0].Visible = true;
                }));                    
                if (--passengers <= 0) break;
            }
        };
        worker.RunWorkerAsync();
    }
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The thing is, the occupied seats only show when everything is done.

That is expected looking at the while loop inside your for loop:

while (Seats.Contains(randomNumber))
{
    randomNumber = RandomNumber(1, numberofSeats);
}
Seats.Add(randomNumber); 

You probably forgot to put the "Add" method inside your while loop. Also check the exit condition - I guess you want to exit the while loop when Contains returns true.

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It's more subtle. He wants n unique random numbers. That's why the loop is there. –  Andrew Finnell Sep 14 '11 at 1:35
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Instead of getting a random number, checking to see if it's taken and then assigning it, I would take a list 1 thru numberOfSeats and shuffle it and start assigning seats in this random shuffled order. That way can avoid the vicious while (Seats.Contains(randomNumber)){...} loop.

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Actually, rather than shuffling, i'd just use a random number between 1 and however many seats are left, then I would use a list with each seat number, then remove whatever random seat was removed until seats == 0 –  Erik Funkenbusch Sep 14 '11 at 0:22
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