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I have a web application that uses AJAX to grab JSON data from the server. It requires that the user first log in with their browser so that a cookie can be set. Only the GET and POST verbs are used, where GET is for retrieving data and POST is for any operation that modifies data.

From what I understand, REST differs from the above method in that the user authentication information is sent with every request and the PUT and DELETE verbs are used as well.

My question is, what benefits does a REST web service have over the RPC-like method, if the end point is only meant to be a user's browser? I can understand how REST is beneficial when the client is unknown, but when I'm only using jQuery ajax calls, are the benefits still worth it over an RPC-like method?

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possible duplicate of Why would one use REST instead of Web services? –  John Saunders Sep 14 '11 at 0:56
    
Not a duplicate. The other post is more about REST vs. SOAP. RPC and SOAP are not the same thing. They can sometimes be similar, but RPC can be much simpler than SOAP for simple things. –  Jason Dean Sep 14 '11 at 1:44
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4 Answers 4

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One of the big differences between REST and RPC is that REST is all about resources, and RPC is more about actions. For example, with a truly RESTful service you would never call something like http://domain.com/service/User/jason/add or http://domain.com/service/User/addUser?username=jason. With RESTful service you only ever reference the resource in the URL and then you define what to do with that resource using HTTP verbs and the body of the request. So a GET request to http:/domain.com/service/jason should return information about the resource (the jason user). You could get more specific and say http://domain.com/service/user/jason but the result should be the same. If you were adding a user named jason you would use the exact same URL http://domain.com/service/user/jason but you would use the PUT verb and the body of the request would contain additional data. To delete the jason resource you would, again, use the exact same URL (http://domain.com/service/user/jason) and use the DELETE verb. To update you would use the POST verb.

REST is great for public-facing APIs that you intend for other developers to use. They can be made to be very standard so that they don't require a ton of preexisting knowledge about the service to use. No WSDL calls, etc. Because of the statelessness it can also makes them more stable during partial network failures.

From what you are describing, I do not think you need a truly RESTful service. But you might want to consider, going forward, if you would ever need a more standard API. I made a REST service for a project that I only use for internal use, but that is because I intended to access that service from, potentially, dozens of other service, and in the future possibly from other developers. So even though at first I was only using it for a couple projects, the ultimate goal required a more standard interface.

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Since REST operates on the concept of resources instead of actions, how would you handle something like "the user clicks on a 'hide sidebar' link, and the web application should modify the preferences on the backend so that it's hidden from then on"? –  Daniel T. Sep 14 '11 at 1:21
    
The onyl way I could see using REST for something like that is if you were storing a client-side representation of the user browsing the site and showing the sidebar was a preference setting for that user. When he clicks on "hide sidebar" you would set that preference for that user and send a POST request to update that user with the new preference. But I think that would be a weird use case. I do not think most developers would try to use REST for that at all. –  Jason Dean Sep 14 '11 at 1:32
    
So in that case, you'd probably use the RPC method, right? –  Daniel T. Sep 14 '11 at 1:34
    
Not even sure I would do that. I it was a permanent change then I probably would. If it was a temporary change then I would probably just use JavaScript and not send a request to the server at all. –  Jason Dean Sep 14 '11 at 1:36
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Assuming you have a /users/user_name (or just /user_name) "resource" on the back end, I'd handle this with a PUT to /users/user_name/preferences. When your application starts, it would to a GET to /users/user_name/preferences to find out how to configure itself. –  Larry Lustig Sep 14 '11 at 20:36
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Think of it this way -- is it the function that matters, or the information that's being acted on?

When you're dealing with REST, you're deaing with a state of information -- you look to see what the current information is (GET), or you change that specific document (POST, DELETE), or you create a new document (PUT).

With RPC, it's about the procedures / function / methods / operations ... whatever you call them in your language. The information is just something that gets operated on or returned from a service ... but it might be one of many. We might be searching, and returning a list of items. Or we might be negotiating something where we need some interaction back and forth. (REST's negotiation for the most part is handled through HTTP, so you have to do things with Accept and Accept-Language header) But it's the operation that's more important.

Then there's the third type, which is document/literal SOAP ... where it's the message that's important, and you have to guess what the function being called is based on the message. If you're just dealing with CRUD operations, this is probably okay. The advantages over REST in this case is that you can still have a WSDL, so you know in advance what the necessary elements are to send, and what to expect in return.

They all work ... it's mostly about how you think about the problem, and how easy it is to convert from what you already have to expose it as an API. If you're starting from the ground up, you can likely do whatever you want. I personally like SOAP (either document/lit or RPC) in that I can give a WSDL file that someone can use to bootstrap their client. I've had cases where people were doing serious queries within a couple of hours. (explaining some of the abstract subtleties of the API, such as the difference between sending an empty string vs. a null took some time, but I would've had the same issues w/ REST)

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You are correct about REST being less coupled to the calling object - if you are comparing to a SOAP web service that requires a WSDL file to be called from the server, than yes, REST web services are less coupled (ie require no knowledge of the web service prior to calling it). And most of the time a token needs to be passed along with request for a given 'representation'.

I don't think there is a huge benefit by using REST from ajax, in fact, depending on the API you are dealing with, you may require a token which is passed in as URI parameter (querystring parameter) while using a SOAP based web service, this is not necessary. It is actually quite easy to combine SOAP web services with ajax calls, pass your data in JSON format and deserialize the JSON into an object on the server side. And to top it off, jQuery makes all of this super-easy.

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It's only really theoretically the case that the caller needs less knowledge. With a large service, the amount that you have to know is about equivalent (because the hard parts aren't described by either SOAP or REST, though WSDL with appropriate semantic extensions could possibly be best — not that anyone bothers with that stuff). –  Donal Fellows Oct 1 '11 at 8:38
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