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I've tried the answer suggested here, which follows with nearly all answers to similar/duplicate questions. Checking .data('events') simply isn't working, returning undefined for objects I had previously (immediately at that) registered an event to.

Now, the caveat is that I'm actually registering said events with .live(), rather than .bind() or the alias methods.


I just read (previous to my even posting the question) the following from jQuery on .live():

The .live() method is able to affect elements that have not yet been added to the DOM through the use of event delegation: a handler bound to an ancestor element is responsible for events that are triggered on its descendants. The handler passed to .live() is never bound to an element; instead, .live() binds a special handler to the root of the DOM tree. In the example above, when the new element is clicked...

Given this information, what would I do (if possible at all) to check whether an event is "registered" to a given object with .live()? With this new-found information, I'm guessing it'll start with the window or document object...


Idea update: If there is a way to tap into the DOM monitoring capabilities of .live(), perhaps I could simply re-bind events via .bind() whenever a change occurs (identically to that of .live(), with however, support for the .data('events') inspection as the events are directly bound.)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you are on the right track...you can find the handlers bound by calls to live() in the document's data object: $.data(document, "events").live

Something like this should be a good starting point to accomplish what you want:

function isRegisteredByLive(selector, eventType)
{
    var isRegistered = false;

    // iterate through all "live"  event handlers and check whether the
    // handler applies to the specified selector and event type
    $.each($.data(document, "events").live, function(idx, obj) {
        if (obj.selector === selector && obj.origType === eventType)
        {
            isRegistered = true;
            return false; // break
        } 
    });

    return isRegistered;
}

$('a').live('click', function() { alert('test'); });

isRegisteredByLive('a', 'click'); // returns true

You could also do something like this to identify all live handlers bound to a specific DOM element:

function getLiveEvents(el)
{
    $.each($.data(document, "events").live, function(idx, obj) {
        if ($(el).closest(obj.selector).length > 0)
        {
            console.log(obj.handler);
        } 
    });
}
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Great! Thanks @RocccoC5 - Worked like a charm, I just needed to add an offset to obj in the first solution (obj[0].selector since it returns a single-element array) –  Dan Lugg Sep 14 '11 at 6:31
    
@Bracketworks - Glad to hear it. Not sure about why you would need to specify an index on obj, though. The call to each() should be iterating through each of the objects in the $.data(document, "events").live array and passing to the function the index of the object as the idx param, and the actual object as the obj param. Take a look at this: jsfiddle.net/Xu3Yn/1 –  RoccoC5 Sep 14 '11 at 6:43

I recently updated jQuery to the latest (1.7.1) and I realized that I cannot use

var liveEvents = $.data(document, "events").live;

because live is not there anymore. Instead you check for click, change, etc. Here is the updated version of the code that I posted on SO before (with older jQuery versions use the other one posted on this page):

(function ($) {
    $.fn.eventRegistered = function (eventName, includeLiveEvents) {
        if (includeLiveEvents != true)
            includeLiveEvents = false;

        if (this == null || this.length == 0)
            return false;

        for (var i = 0; i < this.length; ++i) {
            var events = $(this[0]).data("events");

            if (events == null)
                continue;

            if (events[eventName] != null)
                return true;
        }

        if (includeLiveEvents) {
            return this.eventRegisteredLive(eventName);
        }

        return false;
    };
})(jQuery);

(function ($) {
    $.fn.eventRegisteredLive = function (eventName) {
        var liveEvents = $.data(document, "events")[eventName];

        if (!liveEvents)
        {
            return false;
        }

        for (var i = 0; i < liveEvents.length; ++i) {
            if (liveEvents[i].selector == this.selector)
                return true;
        }
        return false;
    };
})(jQuery);
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I wrote a jQuery function that checks if events for an element is registered (on element and live if necessary)

Code:

(function ($) {
    $.fn.eventRegistered = function (eventName, includeLiveEvents) {
        if (includeLiveEvents != true)
            includeLiveEvents = false;

        if (this == null || this.length == 0)
            return false;

        for (var i = 0; i < this.length; ++i) {
            var events = $(this[0]).data("events");

            if (events == null)
                continue;

            if (events[eventName] != null)
                return true;
        }

        if (includeLiveEvents) {
            var liveEvents = $.data(document, "events").live;

            for (var i = 0; i < liveEvents.length; ++i) {
                if (liveEvents[i].selector == this.selector && liveEvents[i].origType == eventName)
                    return true;
            }
        }

        return false;
    };
})(jQuery);

Examplary usage: var isRegistered = $('.className').eventRegistered("click"); // will return true if click is registeren on at least one element that has a class className

var isRegistered = $('.className').eventRegistered("change", true); // will return true if change is registered on at least one element that has a class className or using live function

Be careful. This function breaks the chain, so you cannot use it like:

$('.className').eventRegistered("change").change(function() {
    // ...
});
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