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Trying the following in 2.8.1/2.9.0.1 REPL, the first gives an error.

val l = List(Vector(1,2), List(3,4,5))
error: type mismatch;
 found   : scala.collection.immutable.Vector[Int]
 required: scala.collection.immutable.Seq[Int]{def companion:     scala.collection.generic.GenericCompanion[scala.collection.immutable.Seq[Any]]; protected def thisCollection: Seq[Int]{def companion: scala.collection.generic.GenericCompanion[Seq[Any]]}; def dropRight(n: Int): scala.collection.immutable.Seq[Int]{def companion: scala.collection.generic.GenericCompanion[scala.collection.immutable.Seq[Any]]}; def takeRight(n: Int): scala.collection.immutable.Seq[Int]{def companion: scala.collection.generic.GenericCompanion[scala.collection.immutable.Seq[Any]]}; def slice(start: Int,end: Int): scala.collection.immutable.Seq[Int]{def companion: scala.collection.generic.GenericCompanion[scala.collection.immutable....
      val l = List(Vector(1,2), List(3,4,5))
                         ^
:5: error: type mismatch;
 found   : List[Int]
 required: scala.collection.immutable.Seq[Int]{def companion:     scala.collection.generic.GenericCompanion[scala.collection.immutable.Seq[Any]]; protected def thisCollection: Seq[Int]{def companion: scala.collection.generic.GenericCompanion[Seq[Any]]}; def dropRight(n: Int): scala.collection.immutable.Seq[Int]{def companion: scala.collection.generic.GenericCompanion[scala.collection.immutable.Seq[Any]]}; def takeRight(n: Int): scala.collection.immutable.Seq[Int]{def companion: scala.collection.generic.GenericCompanion[scala.collection.immutable.Seq[Any]]}; def slice(start: Int,end: Int): scala.collection.immutable.Seq[Int]{def companion: scala.collection.generic.GenericCompanion[scala.collection.immutable.Seq[Any]]}; def take(n: Int):...
       val l = List(Vector(1,2), List(3,4,5))
                                    ^

While this succeeds:

val l = List[Seq[Int]](Vector(1,2), List(3,4,5))
//evaluates fine to List[Seq[Int]] = List(Vector(1, 2), List(3, 4, 5))

What is the type scala tries to infer in the first case? Is it a Seq with a structural type? Why can't it unify Vector and List? Is this some missing feature yet, or is it this way (requiring explicit type def) in order to to prevent shooting myself in the foot?

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works with 2.9.1 scala> val l = List(Vector(1,2), List(3,4,5)) l: List[scala.collection.immutable.Seq[Int]] = List(Vector(1, 2), List(3, 4, 5)) –  Ido Tamir Sep 14 '11 at 10:12
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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This was evidently a bug in the type inferencer which has now been fixed in scala 2.9.1:

Welcome to Scala version 2.9.1.final (Java HotSpot(TM) Server VM, Java 1.6.0_18).
Type in expressions to have them evaluated.
Type :help for more information.

scala> import collection.immutable._
import collection.immutable._

scala>  List(Vector(1, 2, 3), List(4, 5))
res0: List[scala.collection.immutable.Seq[Int]] = List(Vector(1, 2, 3), List(4, 5))
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this means there is a 2.9.1 already :) –  ron Sep 14 '11 at 15:22
    
By the way, here's another bug that exists in 2.9.1 but should be fixed for 2.10: List(collection.mutable.Seq(1,2), collection.mutable.Set(3,4,5)). Error: "type arguments [Any] do not conform to ..." –  Kipton Barros Sep 15 '11 at 5:19
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Based on daniel's answer here, Scala does not use Hindley-Milner type inference and instead does local type inference, moving left to right.

In your first declaration, the first list member is Vector[Int] so Scala says "okay I have a List[Vector[Int]] but then when it gets to the second list element, a List[Int], it becomes unable to unify this with Vector[Int]. The generics must be a problem for the inferencer, because lists containing numbers and strings can be properly inferred to be List[Any].

Something related: vectors and lists can interoperate in 2.9.0.1 across the == operator.

scala> List[Int](1,2,3) == Vector[Int](1,2,3)
res2: Boolean = true

scala> List[Int](1,2,3) == Vector[Int](1,12,3)
res3: Boolean = false
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What is the difference with val s = Set(List(1,2,3), List("xyz")), which works fine? It also has different types from left-to-right (however leaf-types only). –  ron Sep 14 '11 at 6:58
    
So why does the same problem not happen with List(1, 2.0, "3")? I'm afraid you are just wrong –  oxbow_lakes Sep 14 '11 at 7:02
    
@oxbow_lakes Good to know thanks! What is the protocol here, then? Delete the answer or leave it here? –  Ray Toal Sep 14 '11 at 13:07
    
The concept you suggest seems right, but there are two problems with it. First, inside a normal parameter list (ie, not an implicit parameter list), all types are inferred without reference to each other. You could think of their inference as being in parallel, for practical effects. Second, this factory does not take multiple parameters, just one vararg. The type of this parameter will be computed from the bounds given by each argument. It doesn't work because of a bug. –  Daniel C. Sobral Sep 14 '11 at 19:22
    
Thanks for the useful comments; that clears things up for me. oxbow_lakes pointed out the bug. Maybe the bug occurred because generics are just harder to infer in this case. At least it is fixed now. I think I should take this answer down, but your comment should stay up, and the others too, I think. –  Ray Toal Sep 14 '11 at 19:26
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