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I have simple code:

    $(this).parent().remove();
    if ($(this).parent())
    {
        alert( "exist" ); // alert always "exist"
    }

Why li element ( $(this).parent() ) was removed but alert in this scope - that not ?

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1  
thx all for answers – justi Sep 14 '11 at 8:31
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are checking if a jQuery object is truthy. All Javascript objects are truthy, so the if statement will always be entered. Instead you can check if the number of matched elements is truthy:

$(this).parent().remove();
if($(this).parent().length)
    alert( "exist" ); // alert "exist" if this still has a parent element.
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The jQuery constructor always returns something. Try $(this).parent().length instead.

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You removed your previous parent, but now you have a new one, which will be returned by the second call to $(this).parent().

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maybe if ($(this).parent().length > 0) { because jQuery allways return jQuery object

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remove() does not actually remove anything - it disconnects it from the HTML, and leaves it as an orphan, and lets the javascript garbage collector find it and discard it.

BUT, since you have the variable this the garbage collector will not discard it since it's in use.

And because of that your code finds it.

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Using

$(this).parent().remove()

will remove your current object handle $(this) too (in this case child of the parent). So if you're checking $(this).parent() , it actually doesn't exist.

To check, you have to use another handle

$parent=$(this).parent();
$(this).parent().remove();
if ($parent.size())
{
    alert( "exist" ); // alert always "exist"
}
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1  
Removing an object doesn't destroy it. It just removes it from the DOM - it still exists as long as there is a JS reference to it. – jfriend00 Sep 14 '11 at 8:06
    
Yes, you're right. But isn't $(this) as a reference to the DOM element is removed when removing it's parent ? We use $(this).parent().remove() in dynamically added rows in forms frequently. – Mahbub Sep 14 '11 at 8:15
1  
Just because .remove() was called doesn't change the value in this. It's still a reference to the same node it was before the call to .remove() and thus it's node is still valid. – jfriend00 Sep 14 '11 at 8:17

In addition to the truthy issue for jQuery objects already mentioned, the main issue is that .remove() removes the parent from the DOM, but it doesn't destroy it until there are no references left to it. Since you have a reference to this, the removed objects still exist. In fact, a whole object hierarchy can be removed from the DOM and still exist. That's the same state that DOM objects are in when you create them, but haven't yet inserted them into the DOM.

If you look at the source for jQuery .remove(), it calls removeChild() and destroys all jQuery state associated with the object, but does not destroy the DOM objects themselves. They will get cleaned up eventually by the garbage collector if there are no JS references to them.

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var parent = $(this).parent();
parent.remove();
if (parent.length) {
    alert('exists');
}
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1  
But parent.length after parent removing always return 1 - its ok ? – justi Sep 14 '11 at 8:08

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