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I want to be able to dynamically load instance methods during object instantiation. According to my design, the default behaviour is coded in the base class. However, if certain conditions are met during object instatination, I dynamically change this behaviour with another piece of code. This is how I do it:

The default behaviour is coded in first.py:

class First(object):
    def __init__(self, p):
        p = str(p)
        #The decision whether or not to perform default action is done
        #in the following try/except block. In reality this block 
        #is more complicated
        #and more checks are performed in order to assure proper work
        try: 
            strImport = "__import__('module%s')"%p
            e = eval(strImport, {}, {})
            if not hasattr(e, p):
                raise ImportError()
        except ImportError:
            e = None #default behaviour
        if e is not None:
            self.act = getattr(e, p)(p).act #special behaviour
        self.p = p

    def act(self):
        print 'Default behaviour'


import cPickle as pickle



if __name__ == '__main__':
    print 'first'
    first = First('f')
    first.act()
    pickle.dump(first, open('first.dump', 'w'))

    print 'third'
    third = First('Third')
    third.act()
    pickle.dump(third, open('third.dump', 'w'))

In the code above, both first and third perform default action. I can change the behaviour of third by adding a file moduleThird.py as follows:

from temp import First
class Third(First):
    def __init__(self, p):
        p = 'Third *** %p'
        print 'third init'
        super(self.__class__, self).__init__(p)


    def act(self):
        super(self.__class__, self).act()
        print 'Third acted'

After this file has been added, third changes its behaviour. However I'm not unable to pickle the resulting object due to the following error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "C:\temp\temp.py", line 35, in <module>
    pickle.dump(fff, open('fff.dump', 'w'))
  File "C:\Python26\lib\copy_reg.py", line 70, in _reduce_ex
    raise TypeError, "can't pickle %s objects" % base.__name__
TypeError: can't pickle instancemethod objects

It is clear that the dynamically loading method Third.act is causing the problems with pickle. How do I need to change my approach in order to get pickable objects (and more elegant code too)?

Is there a better way to acheive my goal?

share|improve this question
    
have a look at "How to tell for which object attribute pickle fails?" on this site. There is an answer with an interresting help class to tell which part cannot be pickled. –  Louis Sep 14 '11 at 9:18
    
@Louis, I know which method causes pickle problems (see my addition at the end of the question). I'm looking for a way to solve these problems. –  bgbg Sep 14 '11 at 9:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you change your code as follows then it should work:

class First(object):
    def __init__(self, p):
        p = str(p)
        #The decision whether or not to perform default action is done
        #in the following try/except block. In reality this block 
        #is more complicated
        #and more checks are performed in order to assure proper work
        try: 
            strImport = "__import__('module%s')"%p
            print strImport
            e = eval(strImport, {}, {})
            if not hasattr(e, p):
                raise ImportError()

            self.override_obj = getattr(e, p)(p)
        except ImportError:
            e = None #default behaviour
            self.override_obj = None

        self.p = p

    def act(self):
        if self.override_obj:
            return self.override_obj.act()
        else:
            print 'Default behaviour'
share|improve this answer
    
In other words, keep a reference to the instance, not the instance method. Then call the method when required. –  ed. Sep 14 '11 at 10:48
    
Yep, this definitely works, but this way we end up with two almost identical copies of the same object... –  bgbg Sep 15 '11 at 6:55
    
If you want them to be conceptually different then you could try a factory function instead of instantiating First. This function could try the import and then return an suitable instance. –  ed. Sep 15 '11 at 10:56

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