Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a SQL server database and I am pulling dates from it and converting the type of timestamp_t into Int64 as such:

Int64 from_timestamp_t(dtl::timestamp_t& t)
{
    // create a new posix time structure
    boost::posix_time::ptime pt
    (
    boost::gregorian::date           ( t.year, t.month, t.day),
    boost::posix_time::time_duration ( t.hour, t.minute, t.second, t.fraction )
    );

    ptime epoch(date(1970, Jan, 1));
    boost::posix_time::time_duration fromEpoch = pt - epoch;

    // return it to caller
    return fromEpoch.total_milliseconds();
}

I attempt to convert back to a boost ptime from an Int64 as such:

ptime from_epoch_ticks(Int64 ticksFromEpoch)
{
    ptime epoch(date(1970, Jan, 1), time_duration(0,0,0));
    ptime time = epoch + boost::posix_time::milliseconds(ticksFromEpoch);

    return time;
}

For some reason, and I can't figure out why, my dates, hours, etc are all correct, but my minutes are ahead a few minutes from what they should be. Is it because timestamps from the database are in seconds resolution and I'm using milliseconds? How do I fix this?

Applying the following modification as Dan suggested seems to have fixed the problem:

Int64 from_timestamp_t(dtl::timestamp_t& t)
{
    int count = t.fraction * (time_duration::ticks_per_second() % 1000);

    boost::posix_time::ptime pt
        (
        boost::gregorian::date           ( t.year, t.month, t.day ),
        boost::posix_time::time_duration ( t.hour, t.minute, t.second, count )
        );

    ptime epoch(date(1970, Jan, 1), time_duration(0, 0, 0, 0));

    boost::posix_time::time_duration fromEpoch = pt - epoch;

    return fromEpoch.total_milliseconds();
}
share|improve this question
    
Dan's answer did the trick, I modified my solution above –  jjacksonRIAB Sep 14 '11 at 22:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not familiar with SQL Server 2005, but boost posix time has the seconds function if ticksFromEpoch is equivalent to one second.

ptime time = epoch + boost::posix_time::seconds(ticksFromEpoch);

However, the generic way to handle this is presented in the boost date_time documentation:

Another way to handle this is to utilize the ticks_per_second() method of time_duration to write code that is portable no matter how the library is compiled. The general equation for calculating a resolution independent count is as follows:

count*(time_duration_ticks_per_second / count_ticks_per_second)

For example, let's suppose we want to construct using a count that represents tenths of a second. That is, each tick is 0.1 second.

int number_of_tenths = 5; // create a resolution independent count -- 
                          // divide by 10 since there are
                          //10 tenths in a second.
int count = number_of_tenths*(time_duration::ticks_per_second()/10);
time_duration td(1,2,3,count); //01:02:03.5 //no matter the resolution settings
share|improve this answer
    
I find that if I convert to a time_t first and then to a ptime using from_time_t then return total_milliseconds as before it comes out correctly. There has to be something wrong with constructing my posix_time from gregorian and time_duration, but I still don't see it. –  jjacksonRIAB Sep 14 '11 at 22:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.