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We're going to write a new web interface for a big system based on Oracle database. All business rules are already coded in PL/SQL stored procedures and we'd like to reuse as much code as possible. We'll write some new stored procedures that will combine the existing business rules and return the final result dataset.

We want to do this on the database level to avoid java-db round trips. The interface layer will be written in Java (we'd like to use GWT), so we need a way of passing data from Oracle stored procedures to Java service side. The data can be e.g. a set of properties of a specific item or a list of items fulfilling certain criteria. Would anyone recommend a preferable way of doing this?

We're considering one of the 2 following scenarios:

  • passing objects and lists of objects (DB object types defined on the schema level)

  • passing a sys_refcursor

We verified that both approaches are "doable", the question is more about design decision, best practice, possible maintenance problems, flexibility, etc.

I'd appreciate any hints.

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3 Answers 3

I would recommend sticking with a refcursor with well defined keys (agreed on both sides by java devs and pl/sql developers). This is much easier to extend in the future, you can easily convert the refcursor to hashmap and then a hashmap to a POJO using a apache bean utils if needed. I'm working on a big telecom project with many approaches to this issue and refcursor seems to be the best at the end of the day.

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Could you provide some insight on how to convert refcursor to Hashmap and then to POJO? Thanks –  Polppan Jun 27 '12 at 8:46

In the past I have achieved exactly the same with classic JDBC CallableStatement without any perfomance or maintenance issues. With ORM solutions like Hibernate making persistence much more flexible, you can wrap your solution around Hibernate as achieve in this post. Also see this example if you are not already familiar with the way store procedure and CallableStatement works.

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What part of the question is answered by this statement? The OP already knows how to do it; he's instead asking which approach is better. –  Vineet Reynolds Sep 14 '11 at 10:23
    
@Vineet Reynolds "Would anyone recommend a preferable way of doing this?" - and also Read the scenario before that. –  Bitmap Sep 14 '11 at 10:26
    
considering the other answers posted, what value is added by recommending the use of CallableStatement? Maybe you ought to follow your own advice of reading the scenario; using object types and ref cursors is not easy and neither is it maintainable in the long run, and the OP is asking for advice in those areas. –  Vineet Reynolds Sep 14 '11 at 10:34
    
@Vineet Reynolds Which part of "passing objects and lists of objects (DB object types defined on the schema level)" and "passing a sys_refcursor" didn't you understand? do you think POJO when you see the term object? read it again. –  Bitmap Sep 14 '11 at 10:43
    
The question has this statement - We verified that both approaches are "doable", the question is more about design decision, best practice, possible maintenance problems, flexibility, etc. and I don't see how your answer addresses any of those, beyond this phrase - I have achieved exactly the same with classic JDBC CallableStatement without any perfomance or maintenance issues, which only makes the answer incomplete. You haven't stated why anybody must consider this bit of advice. –  Vineet Reynolds Sep 14 '11 at 11:03

It's been a while since I've done something like that, but the way I remember is that you need to define a view that calls your stored procedure, and you can then easily read the result sets from within java, with the OR-mapper of your choice.

So, this seems close to your scenario 1, which never caused any problems in my experience.

The one thing one needs to be careful is transaction handling: If your stored procedures write data, and you call several of them within a Java EE transaction, you might get into a situation of data inconsistency.

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