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I am trying to compile the livemedia libraries as a shared object, so I get the following .so:

  • libBasicUsageEnvironment.so
  • libgroupsock.so
  • libliveMedia.so
  • libUsageEnvironment.so

It seems to be good, but when I try to link against these libraries, I get a lot of errors of undefined reference to the virtual functions they use.

For what I understood so far, if in a class a virtual method is defined as

class MyClass
{
   ...
   virtual myMethod (int arg) {...};
   ...
}

the method is correctly found and linked, but if the code is split in a .h file

class MyClass

{
   ...
   virtual myMethod (int arg);
   ...
}

and in a .cpp file

MyClass::myMethod (int arg)
{
...
}

it does not work any more.

Now, I admit I'm far from being a C++ guru, but why does this happen? Is it a bug of g++? Or is there some hidden feature of the language? If I compile it as a static library is works.

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1  
Is it only the virtual functions that's giving you problems? –  Andreas Brinck Sep 14 '11 at 10:13
    
yes I have the problem only for virtual functions. –  Ottavio Campana Sep 14 '11 at 11:09
    
I add another thing I just discovered. It seems that not all the symbols are correctly resolved in the library. For example nm .libs/libliveMedia.so | grep AMR gives U _ZNK14AMRAudioSource8MIMEtypeEv which is one of the missing symbols and is virtual. So the problem seems to by in the creation of the .so no in linking –  Ottavio Campana Sep 14 '11 at 11:30
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It is not a compiler bug. It indicates that the function definitions are found in the library .so rather than the header, which further implies that you are not linking correctly.

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I think I don't understand your answer. Writing virtual myMethod (int arg); in the .h file is not enough to define the function? Why do I have to implement the function in the .h and not in the cpp file? –  Ottavio Campana Sep 14 '11 at 11:07
    
@Ottavio: No, either is fine. But if you had defined the function in the header file, then you would probably not be getting linker errors. Therefore, you must be defining it in a source file. Therefore, you are not linking that compiled source file properly. Or you compiled the shared libraries wrongly. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 14 '11 at 11:42
    
Well, this afternoon I tried to compile all the code not as a library but as part of the program and I still get the problem. Thus I'm starting to think that it's a library problem or due to g++... –  Ottavio Campana Sep 14 '11 at 15:21
    
@Ottavio: Why does everybody do that? First assume that it's your fault. It's highly unlikely to be a bug in g++. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 14 '11 at 15:24
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Maybe you're missing a -l (minus small L) switch in the linker command line to the library that contains the needed symbols.

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