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I have a List of type Integer eg:

[1, 1, 2, 3, 3, 3]

I would like a method to return all the duplicates eg:

[1, 3]

What is the best way to do this?

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2  
Is the input list guaranteed to be sorted (as in your example)? –  NPE Sep 14 '11 at 10:25
6  
sort the list, then walk it, keeping the current and prior values. if current == prior you have a duplicate. –  mcfinnigan Sep 14 '11 at 10:26
    
No, the list is not necessarily sorted. –  freshest Sep 14 '11 at 19:22
    
This is the kind of things that made me switch to Scala. –  santiagobasulto Nov 15 '11 at 23:16
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13 Answers

up vote 81 down vote accepted

The method add of Set returns a boolean whether a value already exists (true if it does not exist, false if it already exists, see Set documentation).

So just iterate through all the values:

public Set<Integer> findDuplicates(List<Integer> listContainingDuplicates)
{ 
  final Set<Integer> setToReturn = new HashSet(); 
  final Set<Integer> set1 = new HashSet();

  for (Integer yourInt : listContainingDuplicates)
  {
   if (!set1.add(yourInt))
   {
    setToReturn.add(yourInt);
   }
  }
  return setToReturn;
}
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1  
nice solution leifg –  Steve Sep 14 '11 at 10:35
    
Nice use of the Set API. –  James DW Sep 14 '11 at 10:42
2  
yes exactly. But when an elemnt is only present once in the specified list, the element is added as well. Look at the example in the question: My solution will return [1,3] as the number 2 is inserted in set1 but not in setToReturn. Your solution would return [1,2,3] (which is not the requirement) –  leifg Sep 14 '11 at 14:19
2  
Oh! I understand. I was thinking "remove duplicates" but the OP wants "just duplicates". Ok, you've earned my +1. –  Phil Sep 14 '11 at 14:24
1  
I suggest that you use for (Integer yourInt, to avoid unnecessary boxing and unboxing, especially since your input already contains Integers. –  Hosam Aly Sep 21 '11 at 8:00
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You can use something like this:

List<Integer> newList = new ArrayList<Integer>();
for(int i : yourOldList)
{
    yourOldList.remove(i);
    if(yourOldList.contains(i) && !newList.contains(i)) newList.add(i);
}
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1  
Using List here is very ineffective –  Alexander Farber Sep 20 '11 at 17:20
    
And don't get me started on using int as variable type here. It means that for every single iteration, an Integer is unboxed once and an int is boxed four times! –  Sean Patrick Floyd Sep 21 '11 at 7:59
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Use a MultiMap to store each value as a key / value set. Then iterate through the keys and find the ones with multiple values.

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+1, but actually, a Multiset will do. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Sep 21 '11 at 7:50
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This also works:

public static Set<Integer> findDuplicates(List<Integer> input) {
    List<Integer> copy = new ArrayList<Integer>(input);
    for (Integer value : new HashSet<Integer>(input)) {
        copy.remove(value);
    }
    return new HashSet<Integer>(copy );
}
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int[] nums =  new int[] {1, 1, 2, 3, 3, 3};
Arrays.sort(nums);
for (int i = 0; i < nums.length-1; i++) {

    if (nums[i] == nums[i+1]) {
        System.out.println("duplicate item "+nums[i+1]+" at Location"+(i+1) );
    }

}

Obviously you can do whatever you want with them (i.e. put in a Set to get a unique list of duplicate values) instead of printing... This also has the benefit of recording the location of duplicate items too.

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I needed a solution to this as well. I used leifg's solution and made it generic.

private <T> Set<T> findDuplicates(Collection<T> list) {

    Set<T> duplicates = new LinkedHashSet<T>();
    Set<T> uniques = new HashSet<T>();

    for(T t : list) {
        if(!uniques.add(t)) {
            duplicates.add(t);
        }
    }

    return duplicates;
}
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Put list in set (this effectively filter only unique items), remove all set items from original list (so it will contains only items, which have more then 1 occurence), and put list in new set (this will again filter out only unique items):

List<Item> list = ...;
list.removeAll(new HashSet<Item>(list));
return new HashSet<Item>(list);
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+1: If you use a LinkedHashSet it will retain the original order as well. i.e. [1, 3] instead of [3, 1] –  Peter Lawrey Sep 14 '11 at 11:00
4  
This does not work. removeAll removes all occurrences so also the duplicates. –  Adriaan Koster Sep 14 '11 at 11:21
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This is a problem where functional techniques shine. For example, the following F# solution is both clearer and less bug prone than the best imperative Java solution (and I work daily with both Java and F#).

[1;1;2;3;3;3] 
|> Seq.countBy id 
|> Seq.choose (fun (key,count) -> if count > 1 then Some(key) else None)

Of course, this question is about Java. So my suggestion is to adopt a library which brings functional features to Java. For example, it could be solved using my own library as follows (and there are several others out there worth looking at too):

Seq.of(1,1,2,3,3,3)
.groupBy(new Func1<Integer,Integer>() {
    public Integer call(Integer key) {
        return key;
    }
}).filter(new Predicate<Grouping<Integer,Integer>>() {
   public Boolean call(Grouping<Integer, Integer> grouping) {
        return grouping.getGrouping().count() > 1;
   }
}).map(new Func1<Grouping<Integer,Integer>,Integer>() {
    public Integer call(Grouping<Integer, Integer> grouping) {
        return grouping.getKey();
    }
});
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Try this to find duplicates items in list :

ArrayList<String> arrayList1 = new ArrayList<String>(); 

arrayList1.add("A"); 
arrayList1.add("A"); 
arrayList1.add("B"); 
arrayList1.add("B"); 
arrayList1.add("B"); 
arrayList1.add("C"); 

for (int x=0; x< arrayList1.size(); x++) 
{ 
System.out.println("arrayList1 :"+arrayList1.get(x)); 
} 
Set s=new TreeSet(); 
s.addAll(arrayList1); 
Iterator it=s.iterator(); 
while (it.hasNext()) 
{ 
System.out.println("Set :"+(String)it.next()); 
} 
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Detecting duplicates usually requires some kind of sorting algorithm. I would sort the list and then iterate over the list and count the occurences of equal items. If an item occured more than once, add it to the result. This is in O(n*log(n) + n).

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create a Map<Integer,Integer>, iterate the list, if an element is in the map, increase it's value, otherwise add it to the map with key=1
iterate the map, and add to the lists all elements with key>=2

public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<Integer> list = new LinkedList<Integer>();
        list.add(1);
        list.add(1);
        list.add(1);
        list.add(2);
        list.add(3);
        list.add(3);
        Map<Integer,Integer> map = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>();
        for (Integer x : list) { 
            Integer val = map.get(x);
            if (val == null) { 
                map.put(x,1);
            } else {
                map.remove(x);
                map.put(x,val+1);
            }
        }
        List<Integer> result = new LinkedList<Integer>();
        for (Entry<Integer, Integer> entry : map.entrySet()) {
            if (entry.getValue() > 1) {
                result.add(entry.getKey());
            }
        }
        for (Integer x : result) { 
            System.out.println(x);
        }

    }
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This should work for sorted and unsorted.

public void testFindDuplicates() {

    List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    list.add(1);
    list.add(1);
    list.add(2);
    list.add(3);
    list.add(3);
    list.add(3);

    Set<Integer> result = new HashSet<Integer>();
    int currentIndex = 0;
    for (Integer i : list) {
        if (!result.contains(i) && list.subList(currentIndex + 1, list.size()).contains(i)) {
            result.add(i);
        }
        currentIndex++;
    }
    assertEquals(2, result.size());
    assertTrue(result.contains(1));
    assertTrue(result.contains(3));
}
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If you know the maximum value (for example < 10000) you could sacrifice space for speed . I Can’t remember exact name of this technique.

pseudo code:

//does not handle case when mem allocation fails 
//probably can be extended to unknown values /larger values .
maybe by sorting first
public List<int> GetDuplicates(int max)
{   
    //allocate and clear memory to 0/false
    bit[] buckets=new bit[max]
    memcpy(buckets,0,max);
    //find duplicates
    List<int> result=new List<int>();
    foreach(int val in List)
    {
        if (buckets[val])
        {
            result.add(value);
        }
        else
        {
            buckets[val]=1;
        }
    }
    return  result
}
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