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I am writing some code for data analysis, and have to exclude samples based on some criteria. In practice I end up writing code such as:

bool Test(SampleType sample)
{
  if( ! SubTest1(sample) )
    return false;
  if( ! SubTest2(sample) )
    return false;
  if( ! SubTest3(sample) )
    return false;

  return true;
}

The following seems equivalent to me:

bool Test(SampleType sample)
{
  if( ! SubTest1(sample) )
    return false;
  else if( ! SubTest2(sample) )
    return false;
  else if( ! SubTest3(sample) )
    return false;
  else 
    return true;
}

Is there a difference in terms of computing cost? Is there a arguable preferential one in terms of extendibility/maintainability, aesthetics, etc...?

I know this is probably an inconsequential issue, but once I get these questions stuck in my head I NEED to find the answer.

PS: in case anyone cares, my actual code as of 15/09 can be found at the following: http://folk.uio.no/henrikq/conf.tgz

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closed as not constructive by Andreas Brinck, Eimantas, Bojangles, mercator, UncleZeiv Sep 14 '11 at 13:25

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21  
If you are concerned about performance, then measure, with real data, the concrete compiler and library versions, and on the targeted platform. Until you've done this, prefer the version that's easier to read and maintain. –  sbi Sep 14 '11 at 10:44
3  
@sbi I am more concerned with getting a good thought out answer to a question that's stuck in my so that i can get back to working. Thanks for the suggestion though. –  qonf Sep 14 '11 at 10:47
5  
@qonf there is an easy answer: the best approach is to stop OCDing about "inconsequential issues" and get back to working. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 14 '11 at 10:50
6  
Is there no place here where you can ask a question on how things work without others telling you to do it some other way? –  Shahbaz Sep 14 '11 at 11:11
3  
@Shahbaz: Guess what, I strongly suspect Cooking.SE is not the place to ask, um, how to peal a cherry without other users telling you that cherries ought not to be pealed. Annoying, isn't it? –  sbi Sep 14 '11 at 12:22

11 Answers 11

up vote 32 down vote accepted

Compiler generates the same code for both the versions. But the 1st version is better in maintainability aspect if you compare just with the 2nd version.

The code exits when the return statement is encountered; so there is no use of keeping else in the upcoming if. It makes the developer understand the code better.

Also, if this is the literal code then you can still shrink as,

bool Test(SampleType sample)
{
  return (SubTest1(sample) && SubTest2(sample) && SubTest3(sample));
}
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2  
It is not the literal code, but thanks. –  qonf Sep 14 '11 at 10:50
6  
Can't you argue that the second one is more maintainable because you won't forget to put the else if it stops being an early return? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 14 '11 at 10:52
2  
@R. Martinho, there can be numerous possibilities like that. I have answered the exact OP's code. If the return is not there then the entire logic of the code will change. In fact, personally I avoid to keep multiple return values in the function (as it tends to place destructor code for automatic object at every return value). However, OP's requirements are different –  iammilind Sep 14 '11 at 10:57
    
@iammilind I considered declaring a variable at start of the function, and then modify it depending on the results of the SubTest, but I came to the conclusion that i could not see how it would add anything. Unfortunatly, I try to do to much stuff in my "Test" function to make it a one-liner, It could probably be done with a number of additional function definitions, but In my oppinion c/c++ does not lend itself to functional programming (not that i am an expert on functional programming). –  qonf Sep 14 '11 at 11:38
1  
@qonf, if you want to have your code reviewed then there is sister site codereview.se. If you can produce minimal amount of your code then this site will be a proper platform. Many people will well receive it many will criticize it; but I guess you will at least get a reasonable answer. –  iammilind Sep 14 '11 at 12:56

I would do this:

return SubTest1(sample) && SubTest2(sample) && SubTest3(sample);

This won't improve performance, but what the function do may (or may not) be more obvious.

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2  
Whoa, this is what I call optimization :) –  plaes Sep 14 '11 at 10:37
14  
This is cool, but very hard to step over in debugger. –  sharptooth Sep 14 '11 at 10:39
1  
@plaes You think there's a performance difference? –  selalerer Sep 14 '11 at 10:40
10  
@selalerer: Nope, readability "optimization". –  plaes Sep 14 '11 at 10:41
1  
@plaes: +1 to your comment for "readability optimization" –  R.. Sep 14 '11 at 12:27

Both are completely equivalent in terms of behavior and compilers will likely emit identical machine code for both.

They don't even differ that much in terms of readability - both have the same amount of nesting. Compare this to case where no early return leads to deep nesting.

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@Als Yes, my thought exactly –  Andreas Brinck Sep 14 '11 at 10:38
2  
They are equivalent only if you return from each if() –  arnaud576875 Sep 14 '11 at 10:38
    
@arnaud576875: If SubTest1(sample) returns false, SubTest2(sample) will never even be called. What am I missing? –  sbi Sep 14 '11 at 10:42
    
as long as you return from the function in each if(), there is no differnce actually –  arnaud576875 Sep 14 '11 at 10:42
    
they are equivalent. –  Karoly Horvath Sep 14 '11 at 10:43

In terms of readability,

bool Test( SampleType sample )
{
    return SubTest1( sample )
        && SubTest2( sample )
        && SubTest3( sample );
}

is far clearer than either of your options. Otherwise, you definitely want the else to make it clear that once one of the conditions has been met, none of the others will be tested.

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Thanks, but my actual case is slightly more convoluted; its not compressible to an readable single statement. –  qonf Sep 14 '11 at 12:44
1  
@qonf So present your actual case, so we can see it. (What I've found most effective for rendering complex bool functions readable is breaking the expression down into subexpressions, handled by separate functions.) –  James Kanze Sep 14 '11 at 13:10
1  
See question for my actual case. It was not my initial intent to show my acctuall code, i just wanted to figure out if there where any actual difference for the statement in the OP. I think my solution was pretty close to what you suggested. –  qonf Sep 15 '11 at 8:54

You can be sure by comparing the compiled code by disassembling these functions.

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Both are identical. The compiler is likely to figure out how to optimize them so that identical machine code is emitted. I would prump for the 1st code as it is easier to read.

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I can't imagine it will make any difference in performance.

I would use the first one if they were independent tests, and you just want to drop out after one them suceeds and the second one if it's choosing between a set of logical alternatives.

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As far as I know, there's no difference in the resulted machine code. Besides that, who cares? Do you have a performance problem with this code? Performance is a difficult subject that usually should be left to the end of the project and only if there are performance problems they should be found and fixed WHERE THEY ACTUALLY EXIST and not where you think in advance they might be.

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True, if only my mind would let these things go... –  qonf Sep 14 '11 at 10:42
    
I don't agree with anything you said. –  Widor Sep 14 '11 at 10:42
    
If two pieces of code are identical in terms of complexity, there's no reason to not choose the one that's faster. –  Andreas Brinck Sep 14 '11 at 10:46
2  
Performance is a difficult subject that usually should be left to the end of the project why would you leave it for later when you can code it good from the beginning? I agree that OP is going too far with this example, but I don't agree with the fact that while coding you should ignore performance. If you learn which methods are better (whether your "better" is "more optimized" or "more readable"), you should apply from the very beginning rather than coming back for fixes. –  Shahbaz Sep 14 '11 at 11:10
2  
@sbi It can be extremely helpful to point out to someone that they are going about something wrong. It can also be extremely frustrating for the asker if you are mistaken in your assumption on what the ultimate goal of the asker is! Therefore, some humility is prudent when answering in such a manner. Its arrogant to presume you know what a person is trying to accomplish when you only have that persons technical question. –  qonf Sep 14 '11 at 12:33

It mostly depends on how the compiler optimize the resulting code.

the if(.) is typically translated with a compare_to_zero instruction, followed by a conditional jump.

In your case, this will be

CMP(c1)
RETZ
CMP(c2)
RETZ
CMP(c3)
RETZ

or (with the else-s)

   CMP(c1)
   JNZ(a1)
   RET
a1:CMP(c2)
   JNZ(a2)
   RET
a2:CMP(c3)
   JNZ(a3)
   RET
a3:RET

A second pass of the optimizer will see the chain of jumps, invert the then/else (and Z/NZ) skip off the jumps, being at the point a "jump to next", giving exactly the previous code.

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1  
*my lowly "high level programming" brain explodes!!! –  qonf Sep 14 '11 at 12:45
    
This is not actually true for any modern compiler with optimizations turned on. –  Omnifarious Jan 9 '12 at 6:50
    
@Omnifarious Can you be more accurate? WHAT is not actually true? I also spoke about optimization. What are you adding on? –  Emilio Garavaglia Jan 9 '12 at 7:32
    
@EmilioGaravaglia: The assembly doesn't show up the way you state. A set of nested if ... else statements will like result in nearly identical code to a series of if statements with multiple returns. I doubt you could find any measurable performance differences at all. –  Omnifarious Jan 9 '12 at 8:25
    
@Omnifarious: I don't understand the meaning of your comment: It seems to me you are just saying what I just said, with different wording... Am I awake or my post ends with "giving exactly the previous code" ?!?! –  Emilio Garavaglia Jan 9 '12 at 21:50

It depends on the language and the surrounding APIs

The first solution is an typical imperative approach, the focus is on the act of checking something: abort if a, abort if b, abort if c, success.

The second solution is a more functional aproach, one could read it as the curly brace in mathematical definitions (as in: fac(n) = { n <= 1: 1, n > 1: n * fac(n-1)).

The solution should be chosen to match the environment. In Java, Python, etc it would be the first. In ruby the second could be fine.

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there is a good practice that is called "one point of entry, one point of exit". It means that it's better to have only one return in a function.

For now, your function is simple, but in the future, it may grow, become more complicated, allocate temporary variables which have to be freed, etc.

So it's better to use good practices everywhere. It's called "defensive programming", defense against human failures (mine and my colleagues').

I would write it this way :

bool Test(SampleType sample)
{
  bool bRet = true; // by default, set it to the most "defensive" value which will cause the less harm or make the problem evident

  // in the future, you may have inits and allocations here

  if ( !SubTest1(sample) )
    bRet = false; // don't match
  else if ( !SubTest2(sample) )
    bRet = false; // don't match
  else if ( !SubTest3(sample) )
    bRet = false; // don't match
  else
    ; // bRet stays true

  // thanks to the single point of exit, you can do things like that
  if (bRet)
     log("... match");
  else
     log("...no match")

  // here you clean temporary resources...

  return bRet;
}

If you want to improve performance, the best way is to put the SubTestX functions in the best order so that the one that doesn't match most often is first, so less tests are needed to find that it doesn't match.

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4  
oh dear, "good practice" and hungarian notation in C# in the same post? –  AakashM Sep 14 '11 at 12:01
5  
Introducing a "state variable" to manage a "false state" is far being a good practice. Especially on certain platforms. Multiple return has their good reason to exist as goto has its own good reason to exist, as if/then/else as for(;;) and while(). (these last to with and without break.) "Good practice" are contextual. And there is not enough "context" here to suggest them. –  Emilio Garavaglia Sep 14 '11 at 12:11
6  
Single-return-point is false economy. I see no reason to bend control structures around to accommodate it, as you have done here. –  jprete Sep 14 '11 at 12:25
4  
This is nonsense. "Single entry, single exit" is a dinosaur from the times we were coding in languages with no exceptions and no means of resource management. Unless you're hacking in C or assembler, there's no reason to complicate a simple algorithm to the point where I have to mentally execute it, in order to have an idea which values control variables might have, just to understand what it is doing. Control structures will always be easier to follow than control variables. –  sbi Sep 14 '11 at 12:37
1  
@offfirmo bRet is a "state variable". It stores a value that is changed as conditions are evaluated. –  Emilio Garavaglia Sep 14 '11 at 19:56

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