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I am able to find out the duplicate data using this query

   SELECT names FROM group GROUP BY names HAVING count(*) > 1

I am able to get the duplicate data.I just need to know how to rename this duplicate data with the name to new

  INPUT
+-----------------+               
| names           |
+-----------------+
| text1           |
| text2           |
| text3           |
| text1           |
| text3           |
| text4           |
+-----------------+

OUTPUT  
+-----------------+
| names           |
+-----------------+ 
| text1           |
| text2           |
| text3           |
| text1 new value |->RENAMED
| text3 new value |->RENAMED
| text4           |
+-----------------+
share|improve this question
1  
How would you like to rename it? –  Bojan Kogoj Sep 14 '11 at 12:51
    
something like adding new along with the names –  user876200 Sep 14 '11 at 12:52
1  
and what should happen if there are more than on duplicate ? adding new would reduce the duplicates by 1 and then still some duplicates (with an added new) would be in your data... –  Yahia Sep 14 '11 at 12:54
    
ya it would reduce the duplicates and rename to that name along with new –  user876200 Sep 14 '11 at 12:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Assuming you have some sort of primary key on the table, like an auto increment id, you can do the following.

UPDATE Group 
SET Names = CONCAT(Names,' Copy 1');
WHERE ID IN
(
SELECT MAX(ID) 
FROM group 
GROUP BY names 
HAVING count(*) > 1
);

To explain, it will find anything with a duplicate, pick up the Maximum ID for anything in that set, and append "copy 1" to the end of it. You may still have some left as duplicates if you had certain names 3 or more times. Just run it again , this time with 'copy 2' instead of 'copy 1'. Keep repeating this process until you get rid of all the duplicaates.

Update. To borrow an idea from @Yahia and use UUID, you can do the following if you want to do it all in one query.

UPDATE Group 
SET Names = CONCAT(Names, CONCAT ( ' Copy ', UUID_SHORT() ) )
WHERE 
ID NOT IN
(
SELECT MIN(ID) 
FROM group 
GROUP BY names 
HAVING count(*) > 1
) AND
ID IN
(
SELECT ID
FROM group AS G1
INNER JOIN Group AS G2
ON G1.Names = G2.Names AND G1.ID <> G2.ID
);
share|improve this answer

Try this one -

UPDATE table1 n 
  JOIN (SELECT names FROM table1 GROUP BY names HAVING count(*) > 1) d
    ON n.names = d.names
SET n.names = 'new value';

EDIT:

Full code -

CREATE TABLE table1(
  id INT(11) PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,
  names VARCHAR(255) DEFAULT NULL
);    

INSERT INTO table1 VALUES 
  ('text1'),
  ('text2'),
  ('text3'),
  ('text1'),
  ('text3'),
  ('text4');

UPDATE table1 n 
  JOIN (SELECT names, MIN(id) min_id FROM table1 GROUP BY names HAVING COUNT(*) > 1) d
    ON n.names = d.names AND n.id <> d.min_id
SET n.names = CONCAT(n.names, ' new value');

SELECT * FROM table1;

+----+-----------------+
| id | names           |
+----+-----------------+
|  1 | text1           |
|  2 | text2           |
|  3 | text3           |
|  4 | text1 new value |
|  5 | text3 new value |
|  6 | text4           |
+----+-----------------+
share|improve this answer
    
NOT WORKING syntax error at or near "JOIN" –  user876200 Sep 14 '11 at 13:05
    
It should work. I have added full code with output. –  Devart Sep 14 '11 at 13:20
    
as shown in the output how can we just replace new value for one duplicate name –  user876200 Sep 15 '11 at 4:34
    
Please show an example of desired result. –  Devart Sep 15 '11 at 6:24
    
shown in the question –  user876200 Sep 15 '11 at 6:37

use (corrected as per comment)

UPDATE Group 
SET Names = CONCAT(Names, CONCAT ( ' Copy ', UUID_SHORT() ) )
WHERE 
ID NOT IN
(
SELECT MIN(ID) 
FROM group 
GROUP BY names 
HAVING count(*) > 1
) AND
ID IN
(
SELECT ID
FROM group 
GROUP BY names 
HAVING count(*) > 1
);

this makes all duplicates unique with one execution by concatenating a unique UUID_SHORT... except the one with the smallest ID - it stays untouched...

share|improve this answer
    
What about IDs that are in not in the Max(ID) set? This query is a lot like mine, in that it will be have to run multiple times, each time getting whatever the Max(ID) Is. The NOT IN part is actually redundant, because you are only pickup the up the MAX ids. –  Kibbee Sep 14 '11 at 13:08
    
What about changing the second IN part to: AND names IN ( SELECT names FROM group GROUP BY names HAVING count(*) > 1 ); –  H-Man2 Sep 14 '11 at 13:15
    
@Kibee my error... thanks for pointing it out, corrected... –  Yahia Sep 14 '11 at 13:57
    
@H-Man2 that could work... not sure that this change would be enough –  Yahia Sep 14 '11 at 13:58
    
Actually, that won't work, the since you are grouping by Name, it won't pick up all the IDs, but rather a random (probably first) id from each group of matching names. MySQL is unique in this regard in that it allows you to select columns, not aggregated, that you haven't included in the grouping. Most other databases don't allow this, as the resulting value isn't consistent when run multiple times across the same data. –  Kibbee Sep 14 '11 at 14:11

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