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If you have used ASP.NET MVC you'd be familiar with RenderBody. Basically, you have one layout page and several body pages. Something like this:

layout.cshtml:

<html>
  <head>
    <title>Your Title</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    @RenderBody()
  </body>
</html>

index.cshtml:

@{
   layout = "layout.cshtml";
}

<p>Hello World!</p>

So when you call index.cshtml, all of its content will be shown in the layout's @RenderBody section. This is really useful when your pages use a single layout.

Now, my question is, how could I achieve something similar to the code above in php?

EDIT

For those who are not familiar with ASP.NET, when you have an index2.cshtml file like this:

@{
   layout = "layout.cshtml";
}

<p>Hello World, once again!</p>

Then when you call index2.cshtml this time 'Hello World, once again!' would be printed. So basically, when you define the page's layout, all of its content is displayed in the @RenderBody section of its layout. You don't have to explicitly define what page to include in the layout.

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How do you mean without using a template? –  Jon Stirling Sep 14 '11 at 12:59
    
Sorry my bad, I meant framework :) –  Shaokan Sep 14 '11 at 13:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't know ASP.NET but here's how you'd most probably do the same in PHP:

<html>
  <head>
    <title>Your Title</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <?php include('body.php'); ?>
  </body>
</html>

and body.php could then contain

<p>Hello World!</p>

(very) Simple routing example:

$router    =  new RequestRouter; //this class would route a request to a set of templates stored in a persistent storage engine like a database
$request   =  $_SERVER['QUERY_STRING'];
$templates =  $router->resolve($request); //would return an array with the templates to be used
include('master.php');

master.php:

<html>
  <head>
    <title>Your Title</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div>
        <?php include($templates['top']); ?>
    </div>
    <div>
        <?php include($templates['middle']); ?>
    </div>
    <div>
        <?php include($templates['bottom']); ?>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

You could then define a top, middle and bottom template for each page in your database :)

share|improve this answer
    
Maybe I had to be more specific. When you call a second page with the same layout, then its content will be shown. I mean, if you had index2.cshtml and its content was 'Hello World, again', then it would be shown. So, maybe the closest one, following your suggestion, would be using switch to include different files in different cases. –  Shaokan Sep 14 '11 at 13:03
    
Or create a routing engine and route the URL to a set of body templates to be included :) –  tomwilde Sep 14 '11 at 13:05
    
Can you give me an example of how to do that? –  Shaokan Sep 14 '11 at 13:08
    
Edited answer ;) –  tomwilde Sep 14 '11 at 13:20
    
Thank you Tom :) –  Shaokan Sep 14 '11 at 15:38

You can do it (also) with Twig:

main_layot.twig:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <title>Example</title>
    </head>
    <body>
            {% block content %}{% endblock %}
    </body>
</html>

and content:

{% extends "main_layout.twig" %}

{% block content %} Content {% endblock %}
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I know this is an older question, but coming from ASP.net+MVC3 development I found a better solution.

Create a master.php page, such as this (with doctype and whatever else, etc. you get the idea)

master.php:

<head> 
    my_stuff, meta tags, etc.
    <title><?php echo $page_title; ?></title>
</head>
<body>
    <?php include('$page_content') ?>
</body>

next I have a separate folder just to keep it neat, you don't need to (e.g Content/) Place all your content files in this folder, what you include in your ASP.net pages, i'll call mine default.php

default.php:

<div>
    Hello World
</div>

Then create the file you want to hit to load the page content, i'll call mine index.php

index.php:

<?php
    $page_title = 'Hello Example';
    $page_content = 'Content/default.php';
    include('master.php');
?>

The cons:

  • two files per every page, this could be circumvented by putting the page content directly in the variable, but I prefer a separate file for neatness.

Benefits:

  • No extra .htaccess or any additional server requirements
  • Allows an infinite number of variables to be passed by each page
  • Mimics the ASP.net RenderBody() function exactly like you want :D

It's by no means an original idea, I found another web page that utilized this approach and it's exactly what I wanted to do in my web page.

This SO post is the same thing i found when googling for how to do the same thing, so I wanted to answer with my solution.

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