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The user Laurent had an interesting reply to the question [Why hasn’t logic programming caught on?]:

If you look at the influence logic-programming has had in the field of -- air traffic control -- I don't think it can be said logic-programming has not caught on.

A question arises:

Where is prolog used for traffic control systems on the roads? Why is it used instead of languages, such as C or Python, in such environments?

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Why did you jump from air traffic control to road traffic control? –  pfctdayelise Apr 12 '09 at 14:49
    
pfctdayelise: it interests me. Just wondered whether you can use Prolog there. What are the programming challenges there? What are the limitations to use prolog? –  Masi Apr 12 '09 at 15:03
    
and what does the writer actually mean by "air traffic control"? I believe it is rather broad topic. –  Masi Apr 12 '09 at 15:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Prolog is useful at implementing Expert Systems. So if you can think of an expert system useful in controlling traffic, you can use Prolog. I'm not an expert in traffic control and I'm sure it's a very interesting science(as I'm sure any driver sitting at a traffic light can tell you :D), but I think you can create such an expert system that can control traffic light times and synchronization based on statistical data collected over time, of cars passing through an intersection at different times of day.

I have no ideea of any such implemented systems, I'm just saying where I think Prolog might be useful to use.

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+1 thank you for the key word :) –  Masi Apr 12 '09 at 21:06

This paper 'Commercial Applications of large Prolog Knowledge Bases' may be of interest. Another such read is (freely available as opposed to the former which requires Springer-Verlag membership) Finite State Grammatical Model and Parser for Air Traffic Controller's Commands.

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the second paper you reference is entirely theoretical and I believe unpublished –  anon Apr 12 '09 at 14:42

Coming soon...

http://www.adesproject.com

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