Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following code plots to two PostScript (.ps) files, but the second one contains both lines.

import matplotlib
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.mlab as mlab

plt.subplot(111)
x = [1,10]
y = [30, 1000]
plt.loglog(x, y, basex=10, basey=10, ls="-")
plt.savefig("first.ps")


plt.subplot(111)
x = [10,100]
y = [10, 10000]
plt.loglog(x, y, basex=10, basey=10, ls="-")
plt.savefig("second.ps")

How can I tell matplotlib to start afresh for the second plot?

share|improve this question
2  
as a point of style, there's no need to use subplot when you only have one plot per figure. –  Autoplectic Apr 12 '09 at 20:12
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 39 down vote accepted

You can use figure to create a new plot, for example, or use close after the first plot.

share|improve this answer
4  
Great! Thanks! I find it difficult to find what I need in the current documentation format. The pyplot page is very long, and I was not able to see the entry for close() while scrolling. I was searching for something like clean() clear() or flush(). –  Stefano Borini Apr 12 '09 at 14:47
10  
The pyplot tutorial does mention clf() in the "multiple figures" section. Note that if you just create a new plot with figure() without closing the old one with close() (even if you close the GUI window), pyplot retains a reference to your old figure, which may look like a memory leak. –  Jouni K. Seppänen Apr 12 '09 at 20:03
    
You can use plt.close()/pylab.close() to remove all old figures –  Calvin1602 Jan 24 '13 at 8:32
add comment

There is a clear figure command, and it should do it for you:

plt.clf()

If you have multiple subplots in the same figure

plt.cla()

clears the current axes.

share|improve this answer
2  
ty so much for this. I had bar charts that were "bleeding" into subsequent graphs. This command worked perfectly!! –  advocate Jun 10 '11 at 21:52
1  
Thanks! If you are using the PDF backend (which allows you to save multiple plots) you will need to call this after each call to plt.save() –  Ben DeMott Nov 11 '11 at 16:54
    
In my case, plt.clf() was sufficient to clear the figure but insufficient to stop memory leaks, but first calling plt.close() stopped the memory leak. Python 2.7, matplotlib 1.1.1rc1 (ubuntu 12.04). FYI. –  D.J.Duff Jul 26 '13 at 12:58
add comment

As stated from David Cournapeau, use figure().

import matplotlib
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.mlab as mlab

plt.figure()
x = [1,10]
y = [30, 1000]
plt.loglog(x, y, basex=10, basey=10, ls="-")
plt.savefig("first.ps")


plt.figure()
x = [10,100]
y = [10, 10000]
plt.loglog(x, y, basex=10, basey=10, ls="-")
plt.savefig("second.ps")

Or subplot(121) / subplot(122) for the same plot, different position.

import matplotlib
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.mlab as mlab

plt.subplot(121)
x = [1,10]
y = [30, 1000]
plt.loglog(x, y, basex=10, basey=10, ls="-")

plt.subplot(122)
x = [10,100]
y = [10, 10000]
plt.loglog(x, y, basex=10, basey=10, ls="-")
plt.savefig("second.ps")
share|improve this answer
add comment

Just enter plt.hold(False) before the first plt.plot, and you can stick to your original code.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.