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As an example, the default i18n message in message.properties for blank fields is:

default.blank.message=Property [{0}] of class [{1}] cannot be blank

If one wants to customize this with a given class (e.g. user) and field (e.g. login), one does

user.login.blank=Your login name must be specified

with the ".message" suffix left-off. This threw me off for a bit (as I had it in there and it didn't work), so I'm wondering if there is a specific purpose to how the ".message" suffix is used / not used in message.properties?

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There seem to be quite a bit of mismatches in the messages here, beyond just the use of ".message". For example, the default match failure is "default.doesnt.match.message", the specific error is, for example, "user.login.matches.invalid". The correct ones to use are in the Constraints quick reference list, grails.org/doc/latest/ref/Constraints/matches.html. I believe the best solution that can be done is to provide a comment at the top of the message.properties file, guiding the user to look at the right place for defining the custom error messages. –  Ray Sep 14 '11 at 16:47

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There seem to be quite a bit of mismatches in the use of message customization, beyond just the use of ".message". See example below*.

I believe the grails software developers might include a comment at the top of the message.properties file, guiding the user to look at the right place for defining the custom error messages, e.g. in the Constraints quick reference list, http://www.grails.org/doc/latest/ref/Constraints/matches.html. The top level Contraints section in the quick reference does not include the error code field names, but might it be useful to add there.

*For example, the default match failure is "default.doesnt.match.message", but the specific error is, for example, "user.login.matches.invalid".

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