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class A{
  private static $instance;

  public static function getInstance(){

    if(!(self::$instance instanceof self))
      self::$instance = new self();

    return self::$instance;
  }

  public function doStuff(){
    echo 'stuff';
  }


}

class B extends A{
  public function doStuff(){
    echo 'other stuff';
  }
}

A::getInstance()->doStuff(); // prints "stuff"

B::getInstance()->doStuff(); // prints "stuff" instead of 'other stuff';

What am I doing wrong?

Why doesn't class B run it's function?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Look at the code in getInstance:

 if(!(self::$instance instanceof self))
       self::$instance = new self();

All those selfs point to A, not to the class that was called. PHP 5.3 introduces something called "late static binding", which allows you to point to the class that was called, not to the class where the code exists. You need to use the static keyword:

class A{
  protected static $instance;  // converted to protected so B can inherit

  public static function getInstance(){
    if(!(static::$instance instanceof static))
      static::$instance = new static(); // use B::$instance to store an instance of B

    return static::$instance;
  }

  public function doStuff(){
    echo 'stuff';
  }
}

Unfortunately, this will fail if you don't have PHP 5.3 at least.

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Because you've used self in getInstance of class A, when you call getInstance in class B, I believe self is still refering to class A... if that makes any sense.

So basically, you're calling doStuff() on 2 instances of A.

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This is because PHP (in the version you're using) binds static functions to the class they were defined in.

So B::getInstance() returns an object of class A.

I believe this has been changed in PHP 5.3+, as it was a source of great pain to many (myself included!).

Some details on this are up at: http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.late-static-bindings.php

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Try the following code for getInstance()

public static function getInstance(){

    if(!self::$instance)
    {
      $curClass = get_called_class();
      self::$instance = new $curClass();
    }

    return self::$instance;
  }
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self:: is still in class A, no matter what you call it with

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